10 doctors weighed in:
Could excess iron levels be causing my tooth decay?
10 doctors weighed in

3 doctors agree
In brief: Not Likely
Unless you are sucking on a sugar based source of iron, iron supplements are generally swallowed and not a source of increased decay.
If you have dry mouth associated with the reason for your iron deficiency, then the dry mouth condition can increase decay.

In brief: Not Likely
Unless you are sucking on a sugar based source of iron, iron supplements are generally swallowed and not a source of increased decay.
If you have dry mouth associated with the reason for your iron deficiency, then the dry mouth condition can increase decay.
Dr. Simon Rosenberg
Dr. Simon Rosenberg
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1 doctor agrees
In brief: Bacteria and sugar
Decay is caused by bacteria which are naturally occurring in your mouth.
When the bacteria are fed sugar, either simple like sweets or complex like bread or sugar, they produce acid which eats into the tooth.

In brief: Bacteria and sugar
Decay is caused by bacteria which are naturally occurring in your mouth.
When the bacteria are fed sugar, either simple like sweets or complex like bread or sugar, they produce acid which eats into the tooth.
Dr. Monica Scheurer
Dr. Monica Scheurer
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1 doctor agrees
In brief: Iron and teeth
Excessive iron in the body does not lead to increased decay.
We can see discoloration occur when iron levels are high in young children as the iron incorporates into the developing teeth. Once the teeth are erupted iron will not affect them.

In brief: Iron and teeth
Excessive iron in the body does not lead to increased decay.
We can see discoloration occur when iron levels are high in young children as the iron incorporates into the developing teeth. Once the teeth are erupted iron will not affect them.
Dr. Gregori Kurtzman
Dr. Gregori Kurtzman
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Dr. Harvey Shiffman
Dentistry - Cosmetic
In brief: Probably not
High iron levels have not been shown to be a cause of tooth decay.
Tooth decay is a bacterial process enabled by food debris left around the teeth.

In brief: Probably not
High iron levels have not been shown to be a cause of tooth decay.
Tooth decay is a bacterial process enabled by food debris left around the teeth.
Dr. Harvey Shiffman
Dr. Harvey Shiffman
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Dr. Jack Mutnick
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
In brief: Yes
Get into your dentist and disk treatment and preventive options.

In brief: Yes
Get into your dentist and disk treatment and preventive options.
Dr. Jack Mutnick
Dr. Jack Mutnick
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