6 doctors weighed in:

What is the typical pain level of a bone marrow biopsy?

6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Vikram Patel
Pain Management
3 doctors agree

In brief: Bone arrow biopsy

The bones are covered with a tissue called periosteum which has pain nerve fibres and is very sensitive to any injury.
The doctor should numb the skin as well as this deeper layer. The needle is large but proper numbing would eliminate most of the pain. Once the numbing wears off, pain returns in a few hours but should be tolerable. Ice or tylenol (acetaminophen) will be helpful.

In brief: Bone arrow biopsy

The bones are covered with a tissue called periosteum which has pain nerve fibres and is very sensitive to any injury.
The doctor should numb the skin as well as this deeper layer. The needle is large but proper numbing would eliminate most of the pain. Once the numbing wears off, pain returns in a few hours but should be tolerable. Ice or tylenol (acetaminophen) will be helpful.
Dr. Vikram Patel
Dr. Vikram Patel
Thank
Dr. Luis Villaplana
Internal Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Pain

5-7/10. Pain perception is different from patient to patient though, so keep that in mind.

In brief: Pain

5-7/10. Pain perception is different from patient to patient though, so keep that in mind.
Dr. Luis Villaplana
Dr. Luis Villaplana
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Dr. Amy Deeken
Pathology

In brief: Depends...

There should be numbing medicine placed in the skin and periosteum (covering around the bone.
If given enough time to work, putting the needle in these tissues should be relatively painless. However, when the bone marrow is aspirated out, it creates a vacuum inside the bone which can cause a sharp pain to shoot down your leg. It only lasts a few seconds, but it is the one part that can't numb.

In brief: Depends...

There should be numbing medicine placed in the skin and periosteum (covering around the bone.
If given enough time to work, putting the needle in these tissues should be relatively painless. However, when the bone marrow is aspirated out, it creates a vacuum inside the bone which can cause a sharp pain to shoot down your leg. It only lasts a few seconds, but it is the one part that can't numb.
Dr. Amy Deeken
Dr. Amy Deeken
Thank
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