Can lung cancer be contageous or genetic?

Never. Contagious. Squamous and sclc never genetic, but there seems to be some that never smoke and develop lung cancer...More women, and more asian. These are defects in egfr and alk genes.
No and yes. Lung cancer is not contagious. Some lung cancer can be caused by certain gene mutations, such as mutations in genes such as egfr, kras, eml4-alk.
Genetic yes. There are some newly discovered genetic defects associated with certain types of lung cancer. These can help guide therapy if detected. Lung cancer is not contagious.

Related Questions

My dad's got lung cancer but was nonsmoker. Could it be genetic / hereditary?

Possibly. The most common cause is tobacco use/cigarrette smoking. This is most strongly associated with squamous and small cell lung cancers. But there are other kinds, like adenocarcinoma that are also common and it is unclear why. Many genetic mutations are aquired and due to smoking, but some may indicate genetic susceptability. More research is needed. Read more...
Possibly. Non smokers do get lung cancer, possibly from exposure to other cancer causing agents like radiation, radon, and asbestos. In some cases there is simply no clear cause. Read more...
Probable. All cancers have a genetic component. About 10% of the lung cancers occur in non-smokers. To address your unsaid concern, it does not necessarily put you at a higher risk of lung cancer. Read more...
Yes. Non or never smokers can develop lung cancer if they have a genetic mutation to such genes as egfr or eml4/alk fusion translocation. Also, patinets with high second hand smoke exposure may develop lung cancer as well. Read more...

My aunt just died from lung cancer and it started in her lungs. Just wondering if its genetic and if I have any chance of getting it?

Maybe. There can be a genetic predisposition to develop malignancy. The great majority of lung cancer victims are current or former smokers. Most of the rest of lung cancer is related to radon exposure (a radioactive gas that is the product of the decay of radium) and air pollution. No matter what your genetics might be it is your responsibility to avoid known causative factors to minimize risk. Read more...

Is it true that lung cancer genetic?

Possibly. Some families seem more prone but takes smoking r asbestos or another set of irritants for many. Read more...
Not likely. The predisposition to develop lung cancer can occur in families, but there is no direct link between lung cancer and a specific genetic condition. Read more...

Is there a known genetic basis for lung cancer?

Yes. Although over 80% of lung cancer in the United States is caused by exposure to cigarette smoke (both first hand and second hand), some lung cancers are the result to certain mutations. For instance, mutations to the epidermal growth factor receptor (egfr) can predispose some people to lung cancer. Read more...
Not sure the "lung. Cancer" gene has been found, and the carcinogens causing the clinical phenomenon damage dna in multiple ways so that be the time the cancer develops, there are multiple mutations. Detecting specific mutations has lead to "breakthrough" new drugs, oddly mostly in non-smokers and only a small proportion of smoking patients. Probing the genetic and molecular basis is a hot pursuit in labs worldwide. Read more...
Genetic risk... ...For lung cancer is a hot topic of research and there is a large national consortium studying families with multiple relatives having lung cancer to identigy genes that transmit risk. No one gene has been, or is likely to be, found, but multiple candidate "culprit" genes are under investigation. One barrier is finding families willing to participate. Look this up on cancer.Gov. Read more...

How common is lung cancer in non smokers? And is it true only a certain type of lung cancer is genetic? And if so which type?

Lung cancer. Of all lung cancers 97% are smoking related. 3 % in non smokers. Regd the genetic basis of lung cancer, to the best of my knowledge, there is no genetic variant. Sonetimes we see several cases in families but still primarily it is smoking associated. Read more...
Lower. There are still some alveolar cell and adenocarcinomas in non smokers but less squamous. Some nonsmokers did have second hand or other exposures. Read more...
Scientists and. Lung cancer experts are gaga about this: women, non-smoking asians have epidermal growth factor receptor defects maybe 5% of lung cancers, and alk is another molecular detected marker. At the extreme this is about 15%, more likely 5%. Wonderful science. Associated with adenocarcinoma phenotype, not squamous or small cell. It's the tobacco that's the low hanging fruit. Read more...
See below. Most lung cancer patients are smokers or former smokers; however, 15 % of patients with lung cancer have never smoked. The biology of lung cancer in never smokers is strikingly different; mostly adenocarcinomas and are oncogene addicted (egfr, alk and ros positive); it is important to see a lung cancer expert to be able to explore potential personalized treatment in these situations. Read more...

Is lung cancer infectious, dietary, genetic or environmental?

Lung cancer. Cancer is a genetic disease, resulting from changes in the individual cell genetics. Things that cause these basic changes include some known and some unknown factors. We know that smoking tobacco is the biggest risk factor, and that radiation exposure, asbestos exposure and other environmental agents contribute. Infectious agents can cause cancers elsewhere but have only a minimal role in lung ca. Read more...

Both my uncle&my dad had lung cancer&lymphoma at the same time is this rare&could it be genetic? Many males have died from same for generations back!

Unknown. Many genetic predispositions exist that we can't identify. However, lung cancer and leukemia together is unusual and suggests an environmental exposure. Were the victims smokers? Any specific occupation (i.e. Miners or coal workers or other?) i'd be much bore suspicious that your dad and his brother were exposed to something that led to the diseases. Read more...
No. There are known inherited syndromes with lung cancer and lymphoma; however, in your case since multiple family members have had cancers may be important to see a genetic counselor to discuss the need for testing;. Read more...

I have never smoked and I exercise daily and eat healthy. My aunt non smoker died of lung cancer. Genetic? And what are my chances of getting it?

Not genetic. You are doing all the right things to avoid lung cancer. No known genetic link. May be other environmental toxins- second hand smoke, radon, asbestos, other things. Stay healthy! Read more...
See previous answer . Your aunt might have had second hand smoke exposure. Radon exposure is possible and can be tested with test devices sold in home supply stores. By minimizing your exposure to known risk factors you lower your own risk regardless of your genes. Read more...
Variable. First, let me express my sincere sympathy to you regarding your loss. Losing family members to cancer is devastating. Certainly genetics can be a factor for increasing cancer risk--best highlighted by breast cancer. However, other triggers such as radon exposure or second-hand smoke can cumulatively increase your risk. Test for radon at home. Surely healthy habits will go a long way to prevention. Read more...