What kind of doctor treats diabetic foot infections and ulcers?

Multiple factors. Wound care requires multi-discipline input for proper infection control and wound healing. There are multiple modalities and multiple strategies to get a wound infection resolved and closed but it takes a knowledgeable well trained specialist to know when to implement the appropriate treatment during the course of wound healing using evidenced based medicine.
A few. I think if you have a diabetic foot infection the best person to take care of that diabetic foot is a podiatrist. (i am biased, as I am a podiatrist.) there is a team approach with an internist, and possibly an infectious disease doctor and vascular surgeon, to help with antibiotic selection and assess vascularstatus/ need for vascular intervention.
Podiatrist. Podiatrists, vascular surgeons, wound clinic doctors.
Podiatrist. A podiatrist is a very important member of your health care team, along with your primary care physician, endocrinologist, etc. We can provide nail care, check ups, wound care, write antibiotic prescriptions if necessary, perform surgery, and get you custom diabetic inserts and shoes to avoid future problems.
Proffesional care. Treating diabetic foot infections is best accomplished with a team approach. Optimal outcomes can be achieved when your primary physician work together with a podiatrist, neurologist, endocrinologist, vascular surgeon, orthopedist, nutritionist, infectious disease specialist, and pedorthist when indicated. Do not attempt to take care of it on your own. Seek professional advice and treatment.
Diabetic foot. You need to seek care from wound center or podiatrist as soon as possible. The evaluation of a diabetic foot ulcer requires a careful history, investigation of your neurological status of your feet, an assessment of the blood flow, and a comprehensive treatment plan that may include debridement, cultures, offloading (which is the most important issue most of the time), and testing. Do not delay!

Related Questions

My diabetic foot ulcer have bad odur my doctor says I is infected, if it infected should they cut the foot?

Ulcer. If you have an infected ulcer, it may require a surgery called debridement in which the infected tissues are removed to allow for healing. Read more...
The Team. It's well established that diabetics with foot ulcers do the best with a team approach: endocrinologist, vascular surgeon, infectious disease, podiatrist, orthopedist, cde, physical therapist & nutritionist. Treatment needs to be aggressive, not wait and see. Lack of pain will demotivate you, and that's a mistake. Call in other specialists, get admitted and keep fighting! Read more...
Odor. Odor alone does not account for an infected ulcer. Your feet contains bacteria, normal flora, and they will be on the ulcer. The only way to determine if your ulcer is infected with debridement (cleaning) and taking a deeper culture. Cutting of a foot depends on infected bone and joints. An infected ulcer does not necessarily lead to amputations. Read more...
Possibly... Offloading of diabetic foot ulcers, adequate circulation, good nutrition, blood sugar control, regular wound debridement by your physician, and local wound care are essential factors needed for wound healing. If any of these pieces of the puzzle are missing the final outcome may not be a pretty picture. Amputation of the foot may be required if the foot is severely infected. Read more...
Diabetic ulcer. Infections can be superficial or deep, simple or complicated and are very variable. When infection reaches the bone very often amputation and removal of infected bone is necessary or perhaps long-term IV antibiotics. This would have to be discussed with her physician as each case is certainly unique. Read more...
Dfu. The wound needs to be treated with antibiotics if it is infected. The wound often needs debridement to help with the healing process. Sometimes, if the infection is overwhelming, you will need surgery which may require an amputation. Read more...
You should ask. Your doctor for a referral to an advanced wound and hyperbaric medicine center, or just make the appointment yourself. These are significant but do not necesssarily require amputation. Go soon. Read more...

I have pad and a diabetic foot ulcer, I have been taking percocet 10mg/325 but it does not relieve the pain very long, what type of pain medication and how many mg will help me stay pain free through the day?

Nothing. You need to get the blood vessels open and circulating blood to the areas that are lacking blood and are anoxic and ulcerated. Try nattokinase 3 pills 2 times a day taken on an empty stomach . See a doctor who does chelation therapy to clear the toxins in your body and restore circulation. Then the pain may go away without the narcotics. Read more...
Need further workup. The Percocet will not fix the problem, it just masks the pain. First, you need a full workup to make sure you do not have an underlying infection (maybe even of the bone). If the pain is coming from infection, then antibiotics will help resolve the pain. Second, you need a thorough work up of your circulation to make sure it is adequate, if not vascular intervention may resolve the pain. Read more...
Serious problem. You have a serious problem my friend. It is bad enough to have diabetes with a foot ulcer. And now you have pad. That pain you feel is from the pad. There may be no amount of pain medication that will relieve your pain. The pain is from a lack of oxygen to your foot. This needs to be evaluated and perhaps corrected asap by a vascular surgeon. It will help the pain and help you heal. Read more...

Can derma wound cream help treat diabetic foot ulcers?

Diabetic foot ulcer. You should not try to treat a diabetic foot ulcer by yourself. There are 4000+ wound care products, most of them sterile out of the package, so the choice of one product over another requires some help. A foot ulcer in a diabetic requires professional attention as quickly as possible. Do not delay! contact your primary care physician, podiatrist, or wound care center asap. Read more...
See a physician. Diabetic wounds should always be followed by a medical professional who will ensure that you do not have an infection of the soft tissue or worse, the bone(s) beneath the wound. Left untreated, a diabetic wound can rapidly become a more serious problem. Schedule an appointment with a foot and ankle specialist with training and interest in wound management. Read more...
Yes but... Derma cream is just one modality. Wound care requires multi-discipline input for proper wound healing. There are multiple modalities and multiple strategies to get a wound closed but it takes a knowledgeable well trained specialist to know when to implement the appropriate treatment during the course of wound healing. Read more...
Depends. It depends on the type of wound that is present. If it is a wound close to the surface of the skin, it may help. You should have a physician specialized in wound care or a podiatrist look at the wound and make a treatment decision. Read more...
Have it evaluated. Get it professional evaluated and treated. Diabetic foot wounds are no joke. Treatment is a multifactorial process. Read more...

Is there any type of medical management for a stage 2 diabetic foot ulcer?

Diabetic foot ulcer. You need to see a specialist as soon as possible. Some suggestions include wound specialists, podiatrists, primary care physicians, etc. An ulceration in a diabetic in the foot requires attention. I am puzzled by your description of a 'stage 2' as this is not the way to classify these types of ulcerations -- that descriptor is reserved for pressure ulcer classification. Read more...
Yes. A team approach is best. Have a podiatrist manage the foot wound. Off-loading is important. Debriding any necrotic tissue etc. Your internist or endocronologist needs to make sure to optimize blood glucose levels as well as other co-morbidities. Circulatory status must be assessed and if needed a vascular consultation. Read more...
Yes but... Wound care requires multi-discipline input for proper wound healing. There are multiple modalities and multiple strategies to get a wound closed but it takes a knowledgeable well trained specialist to know when to implement the appropriate treatment during the course of wound healing similar to a conductor leading an orchestra. Read more...
Team approach. Treatment includes infection control, offloading, optimizing circulation and nutrition, and wound care. Optimal outcomes can be achieved when your primary physician work together with a podiatrist, neurologist, endocrinologist, vascular surgeon, orthopedist, nutritionist, infectious disease specialist, and pedorthist when indicated. Inappropriate treatment can lead to infection and amputation. Read more...
Yes. You have to find a wound care doctor, usually a local Podiatrist. Your wound has to be assessed and managed. There are a variety of protocols for wound healing that are successful. I highly urge you to not treat it yourself and seek out professional help. Read more...

Can you tell me how hyperbaric oxygen therapy (hbot) treat diabetic foot ulcers?

Involved question... HBOT works on increasing oxygen delivery to tissue that may not have good blood flow. Oxygen is imperative if you want healing to occur. http://www.palmettohealth.org/documents/documents/HyperbaricBrochure.pdf . Read more...

Can somebody tell me how can hyperbaric oxygen therapy (hbot) treat diabetic foot ulcers?

Diabetic Foot ulcers. Hyperbaric oxygen can be used as an adjunctive therapy for diabetic foot ulcers under two main conditions: when the ulceration is deep to the muscle, tendon and bone with signs of infection; and or if there is a bone infection that is chronic and refractory to other treatments. Read more...
Oxygen concentration. Under pressure, the oxygen concentration in the serum and adjacent tissues increase allowing for a temporary improved oxygen delivery to the wound. Read more...
By definition. all wounds are ischemic. meaning they don't have enough oxygen for healing. HBOT super-saturates the wound increasing the chance for healing. Read more...