12 doctors weighed in:
Should I be worried that my baby looks cross-eyed?
12 doctors weighed in

3 doctors agree
In brief: Yes
It is normal for young infants, under 4 months of age, to periodically look cross-eyed.
Older children should be promptly evaluated to rule out more serious eye conditions which could include vision problems. Catarracts, or even tumors. Sometimes the baby's nasal bridge gives the false appearance of cross-eye, this is known as pseudostrabismus.

In brief: Yes
It is normal for young infants, under 4 months of age, to periodically look cross-eyed.
Older children should be promptly evaluated to rule out more serious eye conditions which could include vision problems. Catarracts, or even tumors. Sometimes the baby's nasal bridge gives the false appearance of cross-eye, this is known as pseudostrabismus.
Dr. Ronda Dennis-Smithart
Dr. Ronda Dennis-Smithart
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Dr. Jodi Luchs
Ophthalmology - LASIK Surgery
2 doctors agree
In brief: Needs to be examined
It is important to have your child examined by an eye doctor to determine whether the apparent cross is real or an illusion caused by natural facial asymmetry.
If there is a real cross, early treatment is crucial to avoid the development of amblyopia (lazy eye).

In brief: Needs to be examined
It is important to have your child examined by an eye doctor to determine whether the apparent cross is real or an illusion caused by natural facial asymmetry.
If there is a real cross, early treatment is crucial to avoid the development of amblyopia (lazy eye).
Dr. Jodi Luchs
Dr. Jodi Luchs
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2 doctors agree
In brief: No
Newborn eye muscles are weak and unable to coordinate tracking and fixing well.
Looking cross-eyed is completely normal in a young baby. If you continue to see eyes wandering in different directions after baby turns 4 months, however, you should tell your doctor. S/he may want your baby checked by an ophthalmologist.

In brief: No
Newborn eye muscles are weak and unable to coordinate tracking and fixing well.
Looking cross-eyed is completely normal in a young baby. If you continue to see eyes wandering in different directions after baby turns 4 months, however, you should tell your doctor. S/he may want your baby checked by an ophthalmologist.
Dr. Victoria Acharya
Dr. Victoria Acharya
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Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees
In brief: No
New babies often have disconjugate gaze (the eyes don't look in the same direction), especially if they are not trying to look at anything.
The gaze should straighten out over the first 3 months, but parents should let the doctor know at the 2-week, 1-month, & 2-month check-ups about the gaze. Babies with disconjugate gaze after 3 months, or who have additional symptoms, should see an eye doctor.

In brief: No
New babies often have disconjugate gaze (the eyes don't look in the same direction), especially if they are not trying to look at anything.
The gaze should straighten out over the first 3 months, but parents should let the doctor know at the 2-week, 1-month, & 2-month check-ups about the gaze. Babies with disconjugate gaze after 3 months, or who have additional symptoms, should see an eye doctor.
Dr. Robert Kwok
Dr. Robert Kwok
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Dr. Cory Annis
Internal Medicine & Pediatrics
In brief: No
"looking" cross-eyed is almost never anything to worry about, especially if your child is under 3 months old.
"staying" cross -eyed requires medical attention.

In brief: No
"looking" cross-eyed is almost never anything to worry about, especially if your child is under 3 months old.
"staying" cross -eyed requires medical attention.
Dr. Cory Annis
Dr. Cory Annis
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Dr. Pamela Lindor
Pediatrics
In brief: Yes
In the first three months, many babies will cross their eyes in an attempt to focus.
As they get older, they should be able to keep their eyes straight. If you are noticing "crossing" or turning in of one eye in your older infant, mention this to your doctor. This may be due to an eye muscle imbalance, which needs to be addressed early.

In brief: Yes
In the first three months, many babies will cross their eyes in an attempt to focus.
As they get older, they should be able to keep their eyes straight. If you are noticing "crossing" or turning in of one eye in your older infant, mention this to your doctor. This may be due to an eye muscle imbalance, which needs to be addressed early.
Dr. Pamela Lindor
Dr. Pamela Lindor
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Dr. Jonathan Jassey
Board Certified, Pediatrics
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