Related Questions

If you had rheumatic fever what is the chances of rheumatic heart disease later?

Up to 50% About half of individuals who have rheumatic fever with evidence of carditis at presentation will develop significant enough damage to the heart valves to lead to a murmur later on in life (10-20 years later). The murmur may or may not be clinically significant. Read more...

What are rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease?

Rh fever. Rh fever is an inflammation that occurs following a strep infection which is no treated. It can cause arthritis, rashes and rh heart disease, which can result in damage to the heart muscle, heart valves and/or the pericardial sack (which surrounds the heart. Read more...

Difference between rheumatic fever vs rheumatic heart disease?

ARF can cause RHD. Acute rheumatic fever is an immunologic response to a strep infection. It can cause fever, rash, arthritis and can damage the heart. Not everyone who gets acute rheumatic fever get permanent heart disease. Rheumatic heart disease is due to heart damage from acute rheumatic fever. Read more...

Can you please tell me how rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease differ?

See below. Rheumatic fever can manifest as rheumatic heart disease, but can also manifest as migratory arthritis, central nervous system issues, a rash and/or subcutaneous nodules. All of these conditions arise a few weeks following an untreated streptococcal infection, when the body produced antibodies that reacts with different parts of the body (e.g. The heart, joints, nervous system, etc.). Read more...
Disease and complica. Rheumatic fever is a disease that can developed after an infection with streptococcus is not treated early. This can be complicated by rhematic heart disease and arthritis and renal failure, etc. Read more...

Hi, I am medical student and I would like to find answer for my question (what is the difference between rehumatic fever & rehumatic heart disease)?

ARF. Acute rheumatic fever is accompanied by pancarditis, an inflammatory condition affecting all layers of the heart, including pericardium, myocardium, endocardium, etc. Rheumatic heart disease is the damage done by the inflammation of arf. As a medical student you should be solving issues like this by reading, not by asking questions online. Read more...

My husband was told he needs heart surgery for mitral valve regurgitation and his aorta valve. My husband has been told he needs heart surgery for valves in his heart. Should he get a 2nd opinion? Also I had rheumatic fever as a child. I was told about

Hi . Hi mary, thank you for your questions. First let's start with your husband. There are specific criteria for determining when a heart valve should be repaired or replaced. They are outlined in guidelines from the american heart association and american college of cardiology. Without knowing more specific details about his case, i can only make some general points. First, when there is excessive leaking from the mitral or aortic valves, this causes the heart to dilate and eventually weaken. Alternatively, when the aortic valve gets calcified, thick and narrowed this is called aortic stenosis. When this condition is severe, very high pressure builds up in the heart and the muscle thickens and eventually fails. If left untreated, any of these conditions can cause permanent and severe heart damage. Your husband may need one or both repaired or replaced. Double valve surgery is higher risk, but still feasible. There is no reason to get a second opinion if your doctor can clearly explain to you the criteria by which he needs both valves replaced. It is important to see a surgeon that you trust and who has good reported surgical outcomes. As far as your case, your rapid weight gain and symptoms of fatigue, breathlessness and chest pain are all symptoms of heart failure. If you have rheumatic heart disease, you may also have a bad valve as the cause for these symptoms. You should see a cardiologist and have a complete physical and an echocardiogram (heart ultrasound). If the problem is with your valve, it may be able to be repaired or perhaps replaced. Read more...
Mary, I . Mary, i agree with everything that dr. Moorman pointed out. I would add that generally speaking, if the recommendations made by his cardiologist are sound, and you and your husband would feel better by seeking a second opinion, then your cardiologist should support you. If they don't then i would be concerned that the recommendations being given are not based on as sound of decision making as you might otherwise be led to believe. Read more...
Possibly. If you have questions, ask your doctor. There is nothing wrong with getting another opinion. Read more...

How high is the chances I have heart disease. 23 M, 5'11", 80kg, almost physically inactive, 130/80, cant exercise coz I get tired easily, palps?

More data. You didn't mention if you smoke, what your cholesterol is, if you take medication for your BP, if your parents have/had heart disease, or if you have diabetes. If your answers are average, at your age, your 10 year risk of a heart attack is . Read more...