Are there any ways to overcome the juniper pollen allergy?

Yes. If you know you are juniper sensitive, you can be desensitized using allergen immunotherapy (allergy shots). For many people, this results in a permanent loss or reduction of sensitivity. Medications and avoidance also work, but symptoms will return after the medication is stopped.
Prepare. Treatment of pollen allergy starts with avoidance (not practical), followed by starting allergy medications before the junipers pollinate. The use of steroid nasal sprays is very effective especially when started before the season starts and daily through the season. If still miserable, see an allergist and consider allergy shots. They work and are the only disease modifying treatment we have.

Related Questions

Why are pollen allergy and general allergies on the increase?

Genetic & Environmen. Both genetic and environmental factors play a role. The chances of developing allergic disease is higher if one parent has an atopic condition, and higher if both parents are atopic. Then in the environment "cleanliness" propegates the immune system towards the allergic phenotype. Read more...

How can I prevent a bad pollen allergy?

Avoid triggers. There are four steps to minimizing a bad allergic reaction to anything. First, educate yourself about the problems and treatments. Second, avoid the cause as much as possible. Third, use medications preventatively to reduce the immune reaction. Fourth, if available, consider allergen immunotherapy to also reduce the immune reaction. Read more...

If I have pollen allergy which fruit I can eat?

Depends. There is a clinical syndrome called oral allergy syndrome in which some patients who have seasonal allergies can have symptoms, typically limited to the mouth area, to certain fresh fruits and vegetables. Not all allergy patients have these symptoms. Some of the classic associations are birch -apple and ragweed - melons. Read more...
Pollen allergy. Pollen allergy can develop by inhaling pollen. It is conceivable but unlikely that ingesting pollen may aggravate your pollen allergy. To prevent this, carefully double wash any fresh food potentially contaminated with pollen to eliminate it from the diet. Better still, reduce your exposure to pollen by staying inside during pollen season. Also wearing a good mask when you are outside will help. Read more...

Is having corn pollen allergy the same as a corn allergy?

Not exactly. They are both corn related and those with corn allergy may react to corn pollen with runny nose and or asthma. If the corn pollen allergy is moderate to severe, it is best to avoid corn. www.about.com has a good article on this subject. Read more...

How to get rid of pollen allergy?

Move- but. It is nearly impossible to get rid of pollen exposure unless you confine yourself to a room with purified area (HEPA or AC) . If the symptoms are severe, allergy shots would be a good solution by modifying your body's allergic response to them since living in a bubble is not the option most people choose. See allergist. Read more...

I have pollen allergy & expired claritins (loratadine) what happens if I take 2 tablets?

Perhaps. Depends on how far away the expiration day is and there has been no report showing that expired Claritin (loratadine) products causing adverse health effects. And yes, you can take 2 if one does not work in general, it is preferable to use a product before the expiration date especially on products which are critical to one's health (epinephrine, insulin, antibiotic etc). Read more...
It is OK. The origional dose studies were up to 40mg/day. The most cost effective dose for adults was the 10mg. The medication like this does not suddenly go bad like out dated milk so you are probably ending up with more than 10mg anyway. Read more...