Whats the chance of someone who is already in their 70's surviving a heart operation?

Physiologic age. What determines the morbidity mortality risk of a cardiac operation is not necessarily the chronologic age but the nature of the operation needed the physiologic age and the comorbidities that the person has. The oldest aortic valve replacement patient was a retired physician in the east coast and had it done without any problems at the age of 100. So age itself is only one factor.

Related Questions

What are your chances of surviving a sixth open heart surgery?

Extreme. It really all depends on the underlying health of the patient, the type of surgery, the reason for surgery and the skill of the surgeon. We wish you and your family the best. Read more...
Depends. Outcomes after heart surgery depend on a lot of factors, like the indication for the operation, underlying heart function, overall health of the patient, the operation being done, if the operation is an emergency, etc. Having had multiple prior operations does make it more difficult because of scarring, but it is not the only facotr. Good luck! Read more...

My sister had an open heart surgery onths ago now she is in hospital with congestive heart failure what's the chance to survive?

Ask her doctor. With her permission. We do not have enough information to make that assessment. Her cardiologist is in the best position to make that assessment. Wish you and her the best. Read more...
Multiple variables. Survival in this setting depends on the amount of cardiac damage (lv function), upon the severity of CHF symptoms, the associated systemic tissue perfusion, and other comorbidities (like renal function, diabetes, bp, and cardiac arrhythmias that might be present. Overall, the pre-bypass heart function coupled with such comorbidities will dictate long term prognosis.Respiratory status. Read more...
Depends. Sorry your sister is sick. Prognosis with heart failure depends on a lot of things like age, other illnesses, heart function, the reason for the heart failure, and the extent to which this can be addressed. Read more...

How likely is surviving open heart surgery?

Very good. Risk factors can change that, but generally the risk from surgery is low< 2% dying, bleeding, infection etc. Obese, diabetic, renal failure, smokers do not do as well. Read more...

Open heart surgery risks/chances, what to do?

Complex question. All heart surgery carries risk. Your surgeon and cardiologist should take the time to explain this to you in an individualized manner. If you are not comfortable, then consider a second opinion if the surgery is not truly urgent. You should have some comfort with your surgeon, even if there is tremendous anxiety about the procedure. Read more...
Do your "homework"! Any invasive procedure, especially open heart surgery, carries risks that must make sense if you are to consider the benefits. Assuming that you have a good rapport with your doctors, and they are responsive and attentive to your concerns, your next step is to do your homework. Find out if publicly available data exist on your doctor/hospital performance. If in doubt, go for a 2nd opinion. Read more...

Can there be any chances of blocking heart arteries again after doing heart surgery?

Yes. Either grafts can become blocked, or previous unblocked arteries can become blocked, or original blocked arteries can progress. That's why we suggest cardiac rehabilitation, no smoking ! diet! exercize and overall heart healthy approach. Prevention is good, ! Read more...

My baby girl has tetralogy of fallot. Is there anyway to survive without having heart surgery?

TETRALOGY OF FALLOT. Mortality rate is less than 3 percent for uncomplicated cases. For untreated patients, survival rates are 55 percent at 5years and 30 percent at 10 years. Read more...
No. Patients with tetralogy of fallot are not expected to survive to adulthood without surgery. Surgery is effective, and has a low mortality rate. Read more...
As scary as it is. I can tell you as a grandparent of a child who had open heart surgery at 2 days of age for complex cyanotic congenital heart disease, that whatever the complications of surgery, your child has the best chance of a long and happy life if it is done. Gather your support team, meet parents who have been through this and find a a center that has all the specialists your child needs. You can do this. Read more...