Dr. Ernesto Pretto jr.
Anesthesiology
4 doctors agree

In brief: Feedback

In my anesthesia practice I have noticed that nervousness manifests itself in various ways, depending on personality.
Some patients get very quiet, some giggle, others get defensive, etc. These sort of nervous responses may be unconscious. I suggest you ask close friends who you spend a fair amount of time with to monitor this behavior and tell you when it happens so you can modify it.

In brief: Feedback

In my anesthesia practice I have noticed that nervousness manifests itself in various ways, depending on personality.
Some patients get very quiet, some giggle, others get defensive, etc. These sort of nervous responses may be unconscious. I suggest you ask close friends who you spend a fair amount of time with to monitor this behavior and tell you when it happens so you can modify it.
Thank
Dr. Maritza Baez
Family Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Stay active

Exercise is a great way to relieve stress.
Your body releases endorphins during exercise, which can help you feel calm. If you exercise 30 - 60 minutes a day, your stress levels can improve. When stressed, take 5 slow, deep breaths with your eyes closed, then roll your shoulders forward 5 times, then back 5 times. This will slow your heart rate and release tension in your neck and shoulders.

In brief: Stay active

Exercise is a great way to relieve stress.
Your body releases endorphins during exercise, which can help you feel calm. If you exercise 30 - 60 minutes a day, your stress levels can improve. When stressed, take 5 slow, deep breaths with your eyes closed, then roll your shoulders forward 5 times, then back 5 times. This will slow your heart rate and release tension in your neck and shoulders.
Thank
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Likely nervousness

If your giggling started with your new job, it might be attributed to the difficulties with trying to fit in to a new job/system. If it's happened before, you may want to consider talk therapy to explore the reasons you feel the need to giggle at the end of some sentences; in the interim, because you're aware of what's going on, you could reflect on why you are laughing and act accordingly.

In brief: Likely nervousness

If your giggling started with your new job, it might be attributed to the difficulties with trying to fit in to a new job/system. If it's happened before, you may want to consider talk therapy to explore the reasons you feel the need to giggle at the end of some sentences; in the interim, because you're aware of what's going on, you could reflect on why you are laughing and act accordingly.
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Pamela Pappas
Very helpful response!
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