12 doctors weighed in:
If thyroglob autoantibodies are high (139) but TSH low (.01) and free T4 and T3 (liothyronine) normal, what is likely diagnosis? Symptom includes recent-onset fatigue
12 doctors weighed in

Dr. Colin Kerr
Family Medicine
3 doctors agree
In brief: Thyroid diagnosis
While one cannot be certain from these data, the most common entity that fits this description is hashimoto's autoimmune thyroiditis.
In the early phase, because of the inflammatory reaction in the thyroid gland, more thyroid hormone is released causing the TSH to go low, and sometimes the T4 to go high; after time the inflammation settles down, and the TSH starts to go up, and the T4 goes down.

In brief: Thyroid diagnosis
While one cannot be certain from these data, the most common entity that fits this description is hashimoto's autoimmune thyroiditis.
In the early phase, because of the inflammatory reaction in the thyroid gland, more thyroid hormone is released causing the TSH to go low, and sometimes the T4 to go high; after time the inflammation settles down, and the TSH starts to go up, and the T4 goes down.
Dr. Colin Kerr
Dr. Colin Kerr
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2 doctors agree
In brief: Abnormal lab test
You have to check the WBC count and thyroid us , plus iodine .
In order to determine if you have hashimoto or grave disease, or the gland is under attack for the WBC . Also determine another lab test ate related to . If the TSH is low , also check the prolactin levels plus a complete physical examination. A question : are you taking any thyroid hormone over the c. Or any tx for, can change results.

In brief: Abnormal lab test
You have to check the WBC count and thyroid us , plus iodine .
In order to determine if you have hashimoto or grave disease, or the gland is under attack for the WBC . Also determine another lab test ate related to . If the TSH is low , also check the prolactin levels plus a complete physical examination. A question : are you taking any thyroid hormone over the c. Or any tx for, can change results.
Dr. Lourdes Margarita Landron-Garcia
Dr. Lourdes Margarita Landron-Garcia
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Dr. Robert Lang
Internal Medicine - Endocrinology
2 doctors agree
In brief: Autoimmune thyroid
You may have been hyperthyroid and are now going into hypothyroid.
The TSH changes much more slowly than the T3 (liothyronine) and t4. Remeasure the tests in 1-2 months if you have symptoms, longer if not.

In brief: Autoimmune thyroid
You may have been hyperthyroid and are now going into hypothyroid.
The TSH changes much more slowly than the T3 (liothyronine) and t4. Remeasure the tests in 1-2 months if you have symptoms, longer if not.
Dr. Robert Lang
Dr. Robert Lang
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Dr. Alan Falkoff
Family Medicine
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Thyroid
Hashimotos thyroiditis.

In brief: Thyroid
Hashimotos thyroiditis.
Dr. Alan Falkoff
Dr. Alan Falkoff
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Dr. Lonna Larsh
Family Medicine
In brief: TPO antibodies?
Sounds like you could have an autoimmune thyroiditis.
It would be useful to know if you have anti thyroperoxidase antibodies. You have a risk for becoming hypothyroid, so you should check your tests periodically. Talk to your doc about how often. I hope they have also felt your thyroid to be sure you don't have any nodules.

In brief: TPO antibodies?
Sounds like you could have an autoimmune thyroiditis.
It would be useful to know if you have anti thyroperoxidase antibodies. You have a risk for becoming hypothyroid, so you should check your tests periodically. Talk to your doc about how often. I hope they have also felt your thyroid to be sure you don't have any nodules.
Dr. Lonna Larsh
Dr. Lonna Larsh
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Dr. Joan Giordano
Internal Medicine
In brief: Need more infomation
The test results you describe suggest early autoimmune thyroid disease, possibly graves disease, but the pattern isn't clear. If symptoms progress, redoing the tests in 3-6 months may clarify, and ultrasound or nuclear scan of the thyroid can also help.
This type of problem is slow to make itself known, so regular follow up with your doc is very important.

In brief: Need more infomation
The test results you describe suggest early autoimmune thyroid disease, possibly graves disease, but the pattern isn't clear. If symptoms progress, redoing the tests in 3-6 months may clarify, and ultrasound or nuclear scan of the thyroid can also help.
This type of problem is slow to make itself known, so regular follow up with your doc is very important.
Dr. Joan Giordano
Dr. Joan Giordano
Thank
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