5 doctors weighed in:
Why would someone someone hyperventilate excessively then go completely apneic?
5 doctors weighed in

Dr. John Feola
Internal Medicine
2 doctors agree
In brief: R/O OSA
OSA can be suggested by history and physical.
Excess snoring/daytime sleepiness/apneic episodes/ aM headaches. And the Exam obesity/small oral airway/collar size>18. The definitive test is a PSG with split night/CPAP titration. I would request copy of sleep study and get a second opinion if you are not satisfied with the options. You are young CPAP can be difficult to tolerate. ENT FOR UPP EVAL.

In brief: R/O OSA
OSA can be suggested by history and physical.
Excess snoring/daytime sleepiness/apneic episodes/ aM headaches. And the Exam obesity/small oral airway/collar size>18. The definitive test is a PSG with split night/CPAP titration. I would request copy of sleep study and get a second opinion if you are not satisfied with the options. You are young CPAP can be difficult to tolerate. ENT FOR UPP EVAL.
Dr. John Feola
Dr. John Feola
Thank
Dr. Harold Kim
ENT - Head & Neck Surgery
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Alkalosis
Rapid breathing makes your blood alkaline.
Absence of breathing makes your blood acidic. Your breathing is also regulated by your oxygen level in your blood/brain. Desire to breath, though is driven by your acid/base balance in your blood. As a result, your body going apneic is its response to re-balance it's blood ph to normalcy.

In brief: Alkalosis
Rapid breathing makes your blood alkaline.
Absence of breathing makes your blood acidic. Your breathing is also regulated by your oxygen level in your blood/brain. Desire to breath, though is driven by your acid/base balance in your blood. As a result, your body going apneic is its response to re-balance it's blood ph to normalcy.
Dr. Harold Kim
Dr. Harold Kim
Thank
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