What happens to TSH when the thyroid gland is removed?

It Goes Up. Those who have thyroidectomies need to take thyroid hormone replacement, levothyroxine. Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) comes from the pituitary and increases when thyroid hormones are below normal. Elevation in TSH often indicates hypothyroidism. Adequate levothyroxine replacement keeps the TSH level normal.

Related Questions

Could you tell me what happens to TSH when thyroid gland is removed?

Goes up. Tsh increases when you are hypothyroid. If enough thyroid tissue is removed to make you hypothyroid, the TSH should increase. Read more...

What will happen to TSH when thyroid gland is removed?

It goes up. If you remove your entire thyroid, there will be no thyroid hormone being produced, thus your TSH will go up. If your doctor put you on thyroid hormone replacement and the dose he/she chose is the correct dose, then TSH should stay the same/normal. Read more...

Could you tell me what happens to TSH when we remove the thyroid gland?

Becomes elevated. After removing the thyroid, thyroid levels become low. This causes the pituitary gland to put out TSH as it is trying to get your thyroid to make more thyroid hormone. Since you have no thyroid, the TSH will go higher and higher unless you take thyroid hormone to maintain a normal level. Read more...

How much cAn tsh fluctuate with in the range with normal thyroid gland? Please answer with maximum value and minimum value before/after inflamation?

Inflammation thyroid. Inflammation? What is meant by this? A normal person's TSH can vary within the normal range. There can be assay variation in addition to biologic variation. A serious illness or chronic inflammation can cause "euthyroid sick syndrome" where TSH and T4 decrease, and then increase on recovery from the illness. During recovery, TSH can be above the normal range. Read more...

What is the optimal TSH for a 61 year old female who 16 years ago operated thyroid gland due to hurthle cell ca.? My TSH during all these 16 years (after the operation) was 0, 6 - 0, 4. But two months ago I changed the original swiss medicine eltr

I . I agree with dr christensen. The idea is to suppress the pituitary gland from producing thyroid stimulating hormone (tsh). A rule of thumb that i and my endocrinology colleagues follow is to keep it as low as possible without causing symptoms of high thyroid hormone levels (hyperthyroidism). This suppression is done by taking slightly higher than normal doses of thyroid hormone replacment (levothyroixine is a generic equivalent). Normal TSH levels (at my lab--it can vary from lab to lab) is 0.45 to 4.5. The dosage needed will vary between people, but a good way to start is to go by weight. At this point in your treatment, i would only recommend yearly thyroglobulin levels. Normal thyroid cancer surveillance is not as protocol driven as other cancers (breast/lung/colon) and can vary between doctors. Read more...
As . As you know, TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) is secreted by your pituitary gland to stimulate the synthesis and release of thyroid hormones from your thyroid gland (which has been removed, in your case). Since TSH can also stimulate the growth of thyroid cancer cells, one goal of therapy for thyroid cancer patients is to suppress their TSH to the lowest possible level while keeping their triiodothyronine level (t3) within a normal range. (many physicians strive for a TSH less than 0.1 as long as the patient's T3 (liothyronine) doesn't climb higher than normal). This usually requires a levothyroxine dose between 2.2 and 2.8 mcg per kg of body weight (about 170 to 220 mcg for a 172 lb individual). I hope that helps! Read more...

Thyroid gland is increased in vascularity suggestive of underlying thyroiditis..... Tsh is normal?

Happens regularly. This picture is encountered relatively often. Think of it as if the thyroid is inflamed but still has enough reserve to produce adequate hormone. It can be seen in conditions like subclinical thyroiditis or in hashimoto's disease, after the thyroid is "burnt out" and doesn't produce elevated hormone, but before the hormone levels become low. See an endocrinologist for more information. Read more...