Should I have surgery on a heel spur?

Surgery. As long as you have tried and failed several different types of conservative therapies, then surgery is warranted. Heel spur surgery can be very successful when performed on the right patient.
If it is painful. If a heel spur is creating pain for you and conservative treatment has failed then you may consider surgery. It is usually the plantar fascia creating painand not the spur itself.

Related Questions

Is surgery the only way to treat a heel spur?

No. You should try nsaid's, steroid injections, splints, orthotics and a regular stretching regimen before surgery. Read more...
Heel spur. There are several non surgical therapies to treat heel spurs. You have injection therapy orthotics, and a course of nsaid's all of which can be effective in treating heel spurs, and are non surgical. However if these non surgical options fail they surgery is indicated. Read more...
NO. Surgery is the last thing we do. Stretching, night splints, rest via cast/boot, NSAID, cortisone shot, OTC or Rx insoles, formal PT are just a few things we do. ESWT is becoming popular, but sometimes has insurance coverage issues. Frequently, we say 90% get better w/o surgery. Also, make sure it's not an entrapped nerve problem, or a rheumatology problem as the cause. Read more...

I had heel spur surgery. ;can the pain come back?

Yes. Heel pain is predominantly treated non-operatively. (about 95%) of the time. The research shows that plantar fascia release or heel spur surgery (unless done for nerve symptoms) has about a 50% success rate. So it is quite possible to have recurrence of symptoms. Read more...
Yes. . It depends on what was done for the pain during the surgery? Nerve release? Fascia release? Bone spur excision? If the underlying problem wasn't fully addressed then the pain can come back. In addition, repetitive injury to the heel can recur if one doesn't properly stretch and wear appropriate shoes. Read more...
Yes. Assuming you had a plantar fascia release, possible with removal of the spur...The answer is still yes. The pain was from inflammation, not the spur itself. This, in turn, is often caused by mechanical stress. If you don't eliminate that stress with stretching, good shoes and orthotic support, reoccurrence is certainly possible. The few heel spurs I do operate on always get orthotics first. Read more...

I have a posterior Achilles heel spur. What do you recommend other than surgery?

Heel cord stretches. Bone is made where there is increased stress. By reducing stress in the achilles tendon by stretching, the spur can improve and even resolve. Stand on the edge of a step and allow your heel to lower down until you fell the pull (often painful) in the back of the ankle and calf. Hold the stretch for 10=15 seconds and repeat on the other side. Do 3-4 cycles 2x/day. It will improve in 4-6 wks. Read more...
Lifts-streching-meds. A Medrol (methylprednisolone) dose pack can calm down the inflamation and pain. A heel lift in both shoes will help take pressure off the area. Streching exercises will help to loosen the tightness of the tendon. Iceing can also help relive pain . Read more...
Heel lifts. 1/4" to 1/2" heel lift in affected limb. Calf stretching exercises. Read more...
Shoe modification. You can wear a heel lift in your shoe to raise the irritated area above the counter of the shoe. You can also get serapen injections in the area of maximum pain. Read more...
See below. A very accurate diagnosis to determine whether an injection in the right spot is needed. Read more...
Pallative treatment. If the spur, also called a pump bump, is bothering you in your shoes you can use a horseshoe shaped pad to pad the heel of the shoe so the shoe does not rub on the bump. Changing shoegear may also be in order. If it is not painful, just leave it alone. Sometimes ice can reduce the irritation and make it feel better. Read more...
Padding. You can pad the back of your shoes to keep the heel from rubbing too much. You may also try heel lifts to take pressure off the achilles tendon and keep it from rubbing the spur so much. Anti inflammatory medication would be helpful as well. Read more...
Heel lift. Heel lift to take pressure off of tendon. Read more...
A heel lift. A backless shoe during the summer and topical antinflammatory cream. . Read more...

Just had surgery on my foot due to plantar fasciits, heel spur and nerve damage which caused me a lot of pain. Found a tumor on the nerve. What is that?

Neuroma. A neuroma is a thickening of the nerve due to repetetive trauma. They typically remove the nerve that will cause some numbness, but the trade off is that the pain is gone. These are almost always benign. Read more...
There are . Different types of tumors, it would depend on the pathology report. I would imagine your surgeon would discuss the findings with you. Read more...
Neuroma. I was ask your surgeon for a copy of the pathology from your surgical intervention. The word tumor can be misleading and scary.... Tumor on a nerve may be a benign lesion known as a neuroma.... Check with your foot surgeon www.Acfas.Org. Read more...
Many possibilities. The pathologist would need to tell you from the biopsy. Read more...