How good is a corneal transplant and cateract from a cadaver?

Transplant is good. Corneal transplants to replaced diseased corneas come from the recently deceased (cadavers). Cataracts do not come from that source, but the cataractous lens can be replaced with an appropriately powered plastic lens placed inside the eye. Corneal transplants are generally excellent, provide good vision and frequently may save an eye.
Very good for cornea. Corneal tissue comes from human donors who wished to have their corneas help others. Outcomes are excellent in most corneal diseases. Cataracts are removed and replaced with a manmade plastic implant do they are not taken from cadavers.

Related Questions

Can a corneal transplant be a good way to treat a congential cataract?

No. This will not affect the cataract. The cornea is the surface of the eye (the winshield). A catarct is inside the eye. Read more...
No. A congential cataract is treated with cataract removal. A corneal transplant treats corneal disease and would not correct a congenital cataract unless this is removed at the same time. If the cornea is clear, only the cataract would need to be removed. Read more...
Not specifically . Corneal transplants are done most commonly for corneal scarring, swelling, or ectasias. Unless one of these conditions is present along with the congenital cataract, a corneal transplant should not be necessary. Read more...
Corneal Transplant C. Sometimes congential cataracts can be associated with an abnormal cornea requiring a Corneal Transplant. But a corneal transplant treats corneal anomalies and not cataracts, which require lens removal and an implant or contact lens after surgery. Read more...