Can some tell me what an infectious disease specialist doctor usually takes care of?

All infections. An id specialist treats all infections caused by micro-organisms including viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoa and parasites. We treat infections of every organ of the body. Examples include pneumonia, pyelonephritis (kidney infection), osteomyelitis (bone infections), hiv/aids, meningitis, amoebic dysentery etc. Etc.
As below. Id specialists are trained in various infections, usage of antibiotics, antivirals, antifungals, sepsis etc. Including hiv, aids.

Related Questions

Can an infectious disease specialist (doctor) do all your travel shots?

Not necessarily. Any primary care doctor should be able to help you. But it is better to go to a local health department, they may have all vaccinations, depending on the country you are traveling to.
Yes. If an id specialist runs a travel clinic they can handle all your recommended travel vaccinations.

What type of doctor is better suited to advise a person without a spleen on a vaccine regimen an immunologist or infectious disease specialist?

Either one. Both are capable of giving you the information you're looking for.
Family Physician. Your family physician should be able to advise you on the vaccine guidelines.
Either fine. Id is more easily located, and focuses on the conditions vaccination would be addressing. In general, majority of surgeons / family doctors / internists would be competent in managing a post-splenectomy patient in terms of prophylactic vaccination.

Low grade fevers, fatigue & swollen lymph nodes for over 3 months. Blood work ok. Doc referring me to infectious disease specialist. What will they do?

LN biopsy. If RBV, CMV and blood culture negative, lymph node biopsy recommended.
Infectious Diseases. Experts in this area have some familiarity with almost every other area of medical practice, as it regards infection or diseases that present as inflammation, and so they are the detectives of medicine. They will take an extensive history, perform a detailed exam, labs and imaging. In this case they may follow the golden rule (Go where the money is), and biopsy a lymph node.

General Doctor is sending me to an infectious disease specialist, for getting swollen lymphnode and sick a lot... What will they be looking for? Hiv?

Yes. And other conditions too affectting your immune system. Screening / diagnosing HIV infection isn't a problem nowadays, hope you don't have it if you don't have the risk factors. Other common possibility is chronic infectious mononucleosis, uncommon, but need to be ruled out, a more detailed analysis of your immune system after more history and physical examination would be carried out, goodluck.
Yes, also... Yes, they will look for HIV and other chronic infections such as Lyme disease. They may also look for conditions like immunoglobulin deficiencies. You may also have nutrient deficiencies; you are likely deficient in Vit D unless you take it. All adults should take about 5000 iu of D3/day in fall & winter. Take a quality multivitamin and eat a healthy diet, minimize sugars and junk food. Good luck!

How will I know what does an infectious disease specialist do?

Treats infections. An id specialist treats all infections caused by micro-organisms including viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoa and parasites. We treat infections of every organ of the body. Examples include pneumonia, pyelonephritis (kidney infection), osteomyelitis (bone infections), hiv/aids, meningitis, amoebic dysentery etc. Etc. Some id docs mainly do hospital consultations while some have office practices.

If you have ppo insurance, do you still have to be "referred" to an infectious disease specialist by your dr?

Maybe. Most ppo do not require a referral to see a specialist (called self-referral). That said, most infectious disease specialist will not accept patients unless they have been referred by a primary care physician with the exception of a recent positive result on a home HIV test. Most ia physicians are very busy & it is hard to get an appointment without a physician referral.
NOT Usually... Ppo is an organization of "preferred providers" that the insurance plan has selected and contracted with that usually do not require a referral. But it is always a good idea to include your primary care physician in the loop.

Should a patient with a history of ER visits with episodes diagnosed as or resembling sirs, as shown on profile, see an infectious disease specialist due to history? Or wait until next ER visit?

Best Medicine. The emergency room is the worst place to get ongoing medical care for a chronic problem. You want someone to know your whole history and all of the testing and treatments you have had. The er is designed for acute problems and is not a good place to return to for primary care of a condition. Please get to the infectious disease specialist or your family doctor.
Neither. Sirs isn't really a diagnosis. It's a collection of abnormalities on exam and lab studies. It could be a sign of infection, and in the hospital that's what we are trying to find. I'm guessing that they've never found one. We also see sirs criteria met by patients with other types of diseases, especially rheumatological diseases. You listed some abnormal rheum labs. ..May need rheum doc.