Should I consider breast reconstruction after masectomy?

Personal choice. Breast reconstruction isn't for everyone but it certainly offers several benefits. The most significant benefit is not having to experience living without a breast. Reconstruction can be performed at the same time as the mastectomy ("immediate reconstruction"), or any time after ("delayed reconstruction"). There are many reconstructive options ranging from breast implants to using your own tissue.
Breast cancer. You should consider immediate breast reconstruction. You can find plastic surgeons in your area who perform reconstructions as well as those you breast surgeon should recommend. The forms of reconstruction after mastectomy are fat grafting with brava, single stage and two stage implant, flap surgery such the diep and and combination of these techniques.
Yes. Studies have shown that women who have breast reconstruction feel better about themselves.
Personal choice. Breast reconstruction surgery is a common surgical practice to help restore and recreate a woman's breasts following a mastectomy for breast cancer. Surgical techniques may use implants or a patient's own tissue to recreate the breast. Also, most women don't realize that breast reconstruction is covered by health insurance, rather than being a cosmetic operation you would have to pay for.
Breast reconst. This is a personal preference of the patient. The options should be discussed with a board certified plastic surgeon, also do not be afraid to ask how many have you done. Stay informed.

Related Questions

How long does it take to have breast reconstruction after masectomy?

It can be immediate. Breast reconstruction can be performed at the time of mastectomy. It can be a staged procedure where a tissue expander is placed at the time of mastectomy and implants are placed later. If the patient needs radiation therapy the implants are usually placed after completion of radiation. Timing is dependent on why the mastectomy is being performed and whether there will be adjuvant therapy. Read more...
Breast Cancer. This is a great question. The issue is how safe is it to be under anesthesia for longer periods of time. The short answer is it is very safe. I perform the diep flap breast reconstruction surgery and it takes longer because of all of the steps. These patients do extremely well after surgery and have had the benefit of removal of the lower abdominal tissue just like I do for a tummy tuck. Read more...

How is breast reconstruction done after mastectomy?

Tram flap. One of the common methods is by using the tram flap which is use of patients own abdominal muscle and skin paddle to create breast mound. Read more...
Lots of ways. There are many options these days for reconstruction; some simple and some complex depending on each patients needs and desires. Talk with a plastic surgeon or try www.Plasticsurgery.Org. Good luck. Read more...
Several options. Breast reconstruction uses the patient's own tissue (from another part of the body) or a breast implant. More than 1 surgery is usually needed to complete the reconstruction. The degree of scarring, recovery and risks vary depending on the technique used. The nipple and areola can also be reconstructed. Some patients also have surgery on the other breast for best symmetry. Read more...
Several options. A complete history and exam are needed to determine the best procedure for each individual. Flaps or tissue transferred from another part of the body can be used to reconstruct the breast. Or expansion and subsequent implant placement can also be performed. Read more...

Is a breast reconstruction recommended after a mastectomy?

IndividualPreference. I would consider it an option rather than a recommendation. In my experience, this decision comes very easily to most women who are faced with the need to have a mastectomy--i have met very few women who are on the fence with regard to this. Like any operation, there are pro's and con's, but it is rare that we cannot offer some form of reconstruction to anyone who desires this. Read more...
Up to the patient. This is a complex question, but in almost all cases the choice is up to the patient. Reconstruction can be done at the time of mastectomy or later on; both have advantages and disadvantages. I would recommend consultation with one or more plastic surgeons experienced in breast reconstruction to explore the options in your particular case. Read more...
Elective. It is possible in the healthy patient but it is a "patient's choice" item. It is elective. Read more...
Personal choice. Breast reconstruction isn't for everyone but it certainly offers several benefits. The most significant benefit is not having to experience living without a breast. Reconstruction can be performed at the same time as the mastectomy ("immediate reconstruction"), or any time after ("delayed reconstruction"). There are many reconstructive options ranging from breast implants to using your own tissue. Read more...
Recommended. Some patients would prefer to have immediate breast reconstruction surgery, especially if their mastectomy is for preventing high risk of breast cancer. If the patient has to undergo additional treatments such as chemotherapy or radiation, then a delayed breast reconstruction surgery may be recommended. https://www.mwbreast.com/breast-reconstruction-timing-immediate-vs-delayed-infographic/ Read more...

What is involved with post mastectomy breast reconstruction?

Lots of options. Reconstruction can be performed either immediately (begun) at the time of mastectomy or later after recovery. The two main techniques are either using implants with or without tissue expansion and using your own body tissue. You should consult with at least one plastic surgeon at the recommendation of your primary physician, ob/gyn or breast surgeon. A team approach is best. Read more...
Individual planning. This a complex problem that requires that your surgical plan be coordinated with your treatment team. Depending on many factors the reconstruction should be individualized to your needs. Read more...
Reconstruction. Post mastectomy reconstruction is best treated through a multidisciplinary approach. The reconstructive plastic surgeon should be involved early to help determine the incisions, the eventual reconstruction choices and options, and to advise the patient on the aesthetic ramifications of choosing breast conservation vs mastectomy. Timing, implants or tissue are all choices that have to be made. Read more...
Multiple steps. There are several reconstructive options which can be performed at the same time as mastectomy or any time later. Not everyone is a candidate for immediate reconstruction. Options range from breast implants to "flap" surgery which use the patient's own tissue to recreate a "natural", warm, soft breast. The nipple and areola can also be reconstructed. Typically more than one surgery is required. Read more...

Can I have breast reconstruction at the same time as mastectomy?

Generally yes. Though there are reasons not to perform reconstruction at the time of mastectomy, most women will be good candidates to have concurrent surgery. However, most will need one or more surgeries depending on the type of reconstruction. It is best to ask questions and discuss all the options with your reconstructive surgeon. Read more...
Maybe. Depends on the reason for mastectomy, whether you will need radiation and many other factors. Always a good idea to see a plastic surgeon before the mastectomy so that you plan for the best outcome. Make sure that your breast surgeon is very experienced in breast cancer - typically with a surgical oncology or breast surgery fellowship (or a general surgeon with lots of breast surgery experience). Read more...
Usually. Immediate reconstruction avoids image of no breast mound but also allows preservation of the skin envelope (if it's not directly involved by the cancer) and sometimes the nipple complex. This may afford a more natural look/feel. A complicating factor is need for postmastectomy radiation esp. If a tissue recon is planned. Review your options with your breast surgeon and consult with plastic surgeon. Read more...
Depends. Depends on you, your cancer and your plastic surgeon. Talk with your oncologist and your surgeon about immediate breast reconstruction. Read more...
Most women can. Immediate breast reconstruction allows the patient to wake up from the surgery "whole" and avoid the experience of a flat chest. Having the reconstruction at the same time typically leads to nicer results and less scarring compared to delayed reconstruction (reconstruction performed some time after mastectomy). Most women with early breast cancer (stage 1 or 2) or brca+ are candidates. Read more...
Absolutely. There are caveats depending on the extent and type of cancer you have at the time of surgery. Read more...

Could I have breast reconstruction at the same time as my mastectomy?

Yes. Breast reconstruction is often done at the same time as mastectomy, depending on the type of reconstruction and the type of breast cancer. Inflammatory breast cancer is one type where reconstruction should not be done right away. Your breast surgeon and your plastic surgeon will work together to determine what's right for you. Read more...
Yes. Not everyone wants a reconstruction, but, if you do, i think it is almost always best to have it done at the same time. For one, you save yourself from having an additional anesthetic; also, it saves you from the emotional aspect of the appearance of your chest wall without a breast. Read more...
Yes... In general, most woman can have reconstruction at the time of mastectomy, but there are limitations based on pre-existing medical problems or smoking. Speak to a plastic and reconstructuve surgeon to find out your options. Read more...
Yes. In fact, most centers insist that you meet with a reconstructive surgeon at the time of your diagnosis to discuss all the options that are available to you. Since everyone is different, your options may be different than another person with the same set of circumstances. Insist on speaking with a plastic surgeon prior to any surgery. All related reconstruction is generally covered by insurance. Read more...
Most women can. Immediate breast reconstruction allows the patient to wake up from the surgery "whole" and avoid the experience of a flat chest. Having the reconstruction at the same time typically leads to nicer results and less scarring compared to delayed reconstruction (reconstruction performed some time after mastectomy). Most women with early breast cancer (stage 1 or 2) or brca+ are candidates. Read more...

Can you tell me about breast reconstruction after mastectomy and complications?

Breast Cancer. This is a great question. The issue is how safe is it to be under anesthesia for longer periods of time. The short answer is it is very safe. I perform the diep flap breast reconstruction surgery and it takes longer because of all of the steps. These patients do extremely well after surgery and have had the benefit of removal of the lower abdominal tissue just like I do for a tummy tuck. Read more...

What are the risks and benefits of immediate breast reconstruction if I have a masectomy?

Many. Immediate breast reconstruction is making a big comeback due to several recent improvements, such as skin sparing mastectomy and use of acellular dermal matrix "internal bra" (alloderm). Advantages are fewer surgeries are minimal recovery times, and less depression about body deformity from breast loss. Insist on talking to a plastic surgeon before the mastectomy. Read more...
Depends. Risks are specific to the type of reconstruction performed. However, there is always a risk of partial loss of breast skin if the breast surgeon creates flaps of skin that are too thin. This is a serious risk if tissue expansion is to be performed, as the expander could be exposed and become infected if the skin partially becomes necrotic. Read more...
Immediate vs delay. Immediate breast reconstruction is better if you are pretty sure you will not need radiation therapy and have a relatively small tumor. This plus a skin-sparing mastectomy is state of the art. Read more...
Several. Benefits include less scarring, better cosmetic results, and not having to experience being without a breast. Risks include failure of the reconstruction, infection, bleeding, sensation loss, asymmetry, blood clots, ugly scarring, dissatisfaction with the cosmetic results and need for more surgery. Implant reconstruction risks also include hardening, rippling, rupture, and need for replacement. Read more...
Breast Cancer. The reconstructive technique used works in concert with the mastectomy performed by the breast surgeon. Problems related to surgery are not to be minimized but are the same for virtually every procedure. Specific operations have specific risk such as a mastectomy can result in some skin loss. An infection can lead to removal of an implant. A fat injection can clump and lead to necrosis. Read more...

Can you tell me about breast reconstruction after mastectomy using dermis?

DIEP flap. I believe you are asking about using your own tissue. We normally transfer skin and fat. The dermis is part of the skin. Read more...
Dermis. Dermis, which is the inner layer of skin, can be harvested from the abdomen (or other areas) to use with tissue-expander or implant-based breast reconstruction. This is used in place of acellular dermal matrix, which is derived from pig skin. The use of dermis is different from a TRAM or DIEP flap, which uses skin, fat, and the attached blood vessels for "autologous" breast reconstruction. Read more...