Does it hurt after you get an ingrown toenail surgery at a podiatrist?

Yes, but... The amount of pain is variable according to how bad the problem was, the anesthesia used (or not) and your pain tolerance. That is in the short term. If it has been a while since the procedure was performed more than a few days) or if the pain is increasing, go back for a followup visit and have the cause checked.
Discomfort from shot. Ingrown toenail surgery can give you a lot of relief from the pain and infection. There is some dicomfort associated with the shot to numb the toe.
Sometimes... But it shouldn't hurt too much because if it's difficult we use a local anesthetic. Sometimes it's fairly easy and even a local isn't necessary. It's all worth it either way because of the relief you will feel after it's done .
It can... Pain is common after any surgical procedure. You can limit you pain with use of oral medication, rest and elevation.
Ingrown toenail. Having an ingrown toenail removed is usually not too painful. Most patients experience discomfort with the injection that is given to anesthetize the toe.

Related Questions

If im getting ingrown toenail surgery today. How should I get my podiatrist to put me on crutches?

You probably. Will not need crutches.You may need a surgical shoe. Read more...
No crutches needed. Ingrown toenail surgery does not require crutches. In fact, in most cases you can return to your regular shoes right after the procedure! Read more...
Ingrown toenail. There is really no need to have crutches after having ingrown toenail surgery. If you are experiencing pain after the surgery you should ask for a surgical shoe to help decrease pressure to the toe. Read more...
It may hurt, but... No need for crutches! there is a small piece of nail still embedded in the corner. You need to get that out. If you can't get it out on your own, a podiatrist can. Sometimes this can be done without numbing the toe, but often, anesthesia is necessary. If it is a chronic condition, there is a very successful surgery that can be done to permanently correct the problem. Read more...
May help. Not needed all the time but if you feel that you do not want to put any pressure on your foot, using crutches is an option. Read more...
Just ask him. But I really don't think you'll need it. In 20 years of practice, I have never had to give a patient crutches for an ingrown toenail procedure . Read more...

I am going to have ingrown toenail surgery, does the shot hurts?

Ingrown toenail. The injection that is given to treat an ingrown toenail is a local anesthetic which can burn when the injection is given. Read more...
Depends. On your pain tolerance, severity of problem, presence of infection, circulatory and neurological status as well as the technique of administration of the injection. Generally, if you relax as best you can, under most circumstances, the injection is not excessively painful. Read more...

I have a ingrown toenail for about 2 years now and I want to get surgery but in 5 months, is it bad to wait 5 mnths to get surgery.?

Depends. On the situation. If there is pain and/or infection, some treatment needs to be performed but not necessarily surgery. Sometimes and incision and drainage may be needed and ingrown portion of nail needs to be cut out. If the problem can be treated palliatively without infection than definitive surgery can wait. Read more...
Depends. Does it hurt? If it does...Then as long as you realize it will hurt until then. In terms of are you making the problem worse...And will need a different or more extensive surgery, then no. The same procedure you would have now is the same one you would have in 5 months. Read more...

Does ingrown toenail surgery usually hurt?

Yes. But probably no more than the pain you have from the ingrown toenail already. Away the surgery you are in a post operative shoe with a dressing on which does not put much pressure on the surgical site. Read more...
Very minimal. You will feel a stick from the injection and some burning from the numbing medicine. After that the procedure is painless. After the numbing wears off, the area can be tender for the next couple of days which can be managed by tylenol (acetaminophen) or advil. Read more...

If my nail still hurts 4 months after ingrown toenail surgery would you recommend having a total nail alvusion for the pain to stop?

I would not. If the problem is recurrent you may need to have the border removed permanently. A procedure similar to what you had done, however the border is removed and a medication applied to the matrix, the nail producing cells in that area. Cosmetically , the skin will meet the nail again, but the portion that ingrows will not grow back. Read more...
See the surgeon. There are known complications and improvements. Removal is permanent! Read more...
Have it looked at. You may still have a piece of nail in the corner or a recurrence of the problem. You may want to have a permanent procedure to remove the recurrent ingrown toenail. Have it evaluated by a professional and get the appropriate treatment. Read more...

I have ingrown toenail nail surgery tomorrow and I have a huge phobia of needles can I get a conscious sedative?

Yes..... Your Primary Care Dr can coordinate with the approval of the Anesthesiologist to give you some Ativan, (lorazepam) or something similar with just a sip of water an hour or two prior to surgery. But you may not need that....as this is quite common and Anesthesiologists are used to this concern, and have some good strategies to get the 10 second placement of the IV done quite a bit easier than you'd think. . Read more...
Conscious sedation . is delivered by IV, often with a "shot" 1st for patients with > than average anxiety. If doctor puts "numbing cream" on your skin under an occlusive dressing for at least 1 hr. before venipuncture or local anesthetic, so you won't feel any pricks. Lie quietly; take slow, deep breaths in thru your nose & out thru your mouth. See a psychologist to address your needle phobia after you've healed. . Read more...
It's not the needle. I have performed nail surgery on thousands of patients and cannot remember any one of them telling me that they loved injections. All displayed anxiety, to some extent, of having a shot anywhere, much less in the toe. Understand, the needle is very sharp and does not hurt. The discomfort begins as the medication is pushed into the skin and the skin stretches. If done slowly, minimal discomfort. Read more...