Related Questions

How do they stitch the small arteries in coronary artery bypass surgery?

Immobilize/Magnify. Surgeons use magnifying glasses to a enlarge the coronaries that are very small. The coronaries are immobilized using either a special device (beating heart surgery) or stopping the heart altogether (on bypass). Read more...

How often robotic assisted coronary artery bypass surgery used and advantage co or pro over the regular bypass.?

Depends on center. Robotic CABG depends on the center and on the surgeon. The frequency varies widely from medical center to center. The robotic approach utilizes smaller incisions, is cosmetically more acceptable, lesser pain and the recovery quicker than conventional surgery. Read more...
Rarely used <1% . Rare. Pro -- smaler incision, sternum not sawed in half. Con -- unknown long term results, grafts may not stay open as long as with open procedure, beecause the anastamoses (sewing grafts onto the arteries) are more difficult. Robot has been around for many years. It is notable that < 1% of all CABG are done with robot at this point for reasons noted above. Don't risk your life / future. Read more...
It depends. In the hands of some surgeons, robotic results may not be as good as for others. Choose your surgeon and medical center well. Read more...

What body cavity is used to perform coronary artery bypass surgery?

Center of chest. Coronary bypass operation is performed by cutting the breastbone down the middle and opening up the chest. When the parts of the split breast bone are moved to each side the heart is easily reached. Once the coronary vessels have bypasses in place the sternum is brought back to the middle and held with wire sutures that are permanent. Read more...

Are smokers or obese people not eligible for coronary artery bypass surgery?

Per se, no one is. Excluded. Risk analysis is done for everyone who needs cabg. Risks will always be a reality. But managing risks is the challenge to the "heart team", that includes the patient. Read more...
CABG. No, they are still eligible, but their risks of surgery are much higher. Obesity and smoking would exclude one from getting a heart transplant though. Also, smoking would (at least in my practice) exclude you from having weight loss surgery. Read more...

How effective is a coronary artery bypass surgery for treating atherosclerosis?

It depends. Depending on the number, location, and severity of the blockages, pumping function of the heart, and presence of other diseases like diabetes, bypass surgery can be very effective. For other situations, medical therapy or percunateous coronary interventions can be better. a healthy lifestyle is always the foundation of treatment, and a physician should be consulted for the most appropriate data. . Read more...

Are you aware of any sternal precaution guidelines post coronary artery bypass surgery?

Absolutely. After heart surgery, the most important part of healing is the sternum. Developing an infection after surgery here is one of the most dreaded problems. Protecting the sternum is of upmost importance. We recommend about one month limited lifting, no pushing/pulling with the arms, and no driving. For the second month, increased lifting with driving, and after the third month, unlimited. Read more...