Where do most myocardial infarctions occur?

Varies. You have three main blood vessels feeding the heart - the right coronary, left circumflex, and the left anterior descending arteries. Narrowing can occur in any of the vessels and can be significant in any one or combination of these vessels. Bypass of the left anterior descending artery has shown the best change for improvement in life expectancy.

Related Questions

Are myocardial infarctions curable?

Yes and no. Well if you truly had a myocardial infarction, some of the heart muscle has been damaged and that is not curable. But you may do well if it is just a small amount of muscle. And even if it is a larger amount, medications can improve the symptoms so that you may di fine even if there is not a cure. Read more...
No. A myocardial infarction is an acute event in which a portion of the heart is irreversably destroyed, usually by a blocked artery. The major lesson is that this damage is potentially avoided if people come to an er promptly when they have symptoms, which have been discussed elsewhere. We have a short time window to use modern treatment to save the heart and prevent complications and death. Read more...

How can troponin relate to myocardial infarctions?

Enzyme from heart. Troponin is contained within heart muscle cells and in a heart attack the damaged cells 'leak" the troponin into the blood and the elevated levels can tell doctors the heart has been injured. If other clinical evidence is consistent this can help diagnose a heart attack. Read more...
Injured heart muscle. Injured heart muscle leak troponin into the blood stream and cause elevated blood levels. Read more...

How can troponin help with myocardial infarctions?

Diagnosis. Since troponins measure damage to the heart muscle which occurs in a heart attack - the damaged/dying muscle will leak these into the serum which can be measured - they can be used to determine if a heart attack has occurred. Read more...

The mortality rate for myocardial infarctions is what?

Goes up with age. Numbers are approximate: (all comers) <1980: 20 % mortality 1990: (with thrombolysis):10-15% 2000: (with pci):5-10% 2010: (with drug eluting stents):2-5% the sooner one arrives, the lower the mortality. Age, lung, kidney and cerebrovascular disease increase mortality. Age is a factor but not as much as the above. Read more...

Is there a connection with cholesterol and myocardial infarctions?

Yes. Populations studies have shown that people with high blood cholesterol have higher incidence of myocardial infarction and other vascular disorders. Read more...
LDLHDLnotCholesterol. It have been known, for over 7 decades, that artery disease typically begins ~age 7, yet remains asymptomatic for decades; artery walls thicken & enlarge, not narrow. Events, including stenosis (narrowing), result from plaque rupture & clots. Optimize NMR particle test (hdl & LDL concentration, not cholesterol), keep hba1c low, optional ?5.0%, sbp ?120 mmhg, don’t smoke, exercise, avoid sugar, etc. Read more...

What is the age-related mortality rate for myocardial infarctions?

Goes up with age. Numbers are approximate: (all comers) <1980: 20 % mortality 1990: (with thrombolysis):10-15% 2000: (with pci):5-10% 2010: (with drug eluting stents):2-5% the sooner one arrives, the lower the mortality. Age, lung, kidney and cerebrovascular disease increase mortality. Age is a factor but not as much as the above. Read more...

What is the difference between a heart attack, myocardial infarction?

Not Much. Heart attack is a general term that can include chest pain from angina to bad rhythms in your heart or any other discomfort causing heart related abnormality. However, myocardial infarction means that the blood flow to part of your heart has be compromised and is killing the muscle of your heart. This is when we take you to a catheter lab and place stents in your arteries to open up the flow. Read more...
Same. Heart attack is the lay term for myocardial infarction (comes in two levels of severity..Non-st-elevation and st-elevation - which refer to changes on an ekg and broadly reflect if an arterial occlusion is total or subtotal). Read more...