What are the signs of? A ventricular septal defect?

VSD. A vsd is a hole between the bottom two pumping chambers of the heart. Symptoms are usually based on age and size. A young infant born with a large vsd can progressive to congestive heart failure. The right ventricle receives extra blood flow from the left and sends it to the lungs resulting in fluid overload. Some medications used are Lasix (furosemide) to manage medically as infant gains weight before surgery.

Related Questions

How do you treat a? Ventricular septal defect?

No u. Depending on the size, sometimes a vsd will close on its own. Other times a patch or surgery is required. Read more...
Varies. This is one of the more common congenital heart defects and many pediatricians recognize it by location and sound at birth or within a few days. As many as 1/2 will close on their own by a year of age. The bigger ones may produce no murmur early on and may require patching when they are old enough & big enough for the docs to consider the timing right. Read more...

What is the symptoms of having a ventricular septal defect?

Depends on size. Many vsds are mild and close on their own. Some are quite big and need surgery to repair them. Symptoms can be nothing to fatigue from shunting blood the wrong way. There is usually a loud heart murmur but that does not cause symptoms alone. A cardiologist can provide more information for the specific patient. Read more...
Depends on age. Symptoms depend on age and the size of the vsd. Small vsds usually are asymptomatic except for a murmur heard on exam. Moderate to large vsds usually present with respiratory distress, sweating, poor feeding and poor weight gain in infants (1-2 mo old). Also exercise intolerance in older children. Read more...

What symptoms are associated with a ventricular septal defect?

Usually None. Vsd's in kids rarely causes any symptoms. Theoretically signs of heart failure such as shortness of breath, fatigue, paleness may occur. Read more...
Depends. Small vsds cause no symptoms. Large vsds in babies cause difficulty with feeding, gaining weight, and excessive sweating. If someone has a relatively large vsd that is not treated early in life, this will eventually cause pulmonary hypertension (high blood pressure in the lung arteries), which makes it hard for blood to get throught the lungs. This eventually causes the patient to turn blue. Read more...

How risky is it for a child with a ventricular septal defect?

VSD. A vsd or ventricular septal defect is a communication between the bottom two pumping chambers of the heart. It can vary by size and location. A large vsd will result in excess blood flow to lungs and pulmonary edema and eventual congestive heart failure. This usually presents by 3-6 months of age. Please speak to your pediatric cardiologist about any questions and/or concern. Read more...
Varies. A VSD or hole between the lower chambers is created when the wall that usually separates them fails to complete its formation. Many are small, produce a loud high pitched murmur heard at birth & close spontaneously within the first year.Bigger ones may not have a murmur initially but can lead the heart to fail from overwork, producing poor feeding,lethargy,etc.Operative closure will fix these. Read more...

When is surgery indicated for? A ventricular septal defect?

Variable. A small vsd may close spontaneously as a baby grows or the babies system may decompensate under the strain of the extra work & progress to heart failure. Many times this can be managed for a time with meds. If baby is thriving on meds & close observation, they may wait before repairing the defect.This decision is made by the surgeon & pedi-cardiologist based on individual factors. Read more...