What happens in an arthroscopic shoulder surgery for anesthesia?

Regional or general. Shoulder surgery is most commonly done under general anesthesia. Patients are often given a nerve block that helps with pain control for several hours after surgery. In some instances shoulder surgery can be done using a nerve block with sedation.
Combo. A combination of general anesthesia combined with a regional nerve block. This is the current standard of care. The nerve block reduces pain during surgery and after. Nerve blocks have reduced the amount of general anesthesia needed, making shoulder surgery mostly an outpatient experience.
See below. This operation is usually done with a combination of regional anesthesia and general anesthesia. Once you arrive an IV will be started and your sedation will commence. From this moment on you might not remember much. First a regional block is placed in your shoulder to provide intra-op and post op pain relief. Then you will be put under general anesthesia for the operation.

Related Questions

Can I use regional anesthesia with a sedative, instead of general anesthesia for my arthroscopic shoulder surgery? I don't like being put under

Inter Scalen block. You can ask your anesthesiologist during preop visit to consider inter scalene block . There is possibility of failure in this block , so some ortho surgeons don't like it. Read more...
Yes. Regional anesthesia (nerve block) with sedation is a great option. Speak with your anesthesiologist to determine if there are no contraindicating factors. Sometimes general w/ or w/out regional maybe necessary. It is normal to feel anxious about "being put under" however general anesthesia is employed safely everyday! Read more...
Yes you can. Have an interscalene regional block done under sedation, with the surgery with the block and sedation. Another advantage is you will have no pain when the surgery is finished requiring narcotics. Read more...
Maybe! Regional blocks with sedation may be a good option for you, although they are not done in all centers. Bear in mind though that any block can fail or wear off, so you might need general anesthesia anyway. Discuss options with your physician anesthesiologist. You can have a phone call or consult ahead of time if you wish. Ga is remarkably safe. Read more...

After an arthroscopic shoulder surgery will there be permanent scars on the shoulder skin?

Yes. They will likely be small and relatively inconspicuous when healed, especially if kept out of the sun or tanning bed while pink (6-12 months). But the scope has to be inserted into the shoulder somehow, and that is via small incisions that leave permanent scars. Read more...

What are the risks of arthroscopic shoulder surgery?

Infection. An infection is the greatest risk but it is less than one percent. Nerve injury and stiffness are also risks. Read more...
Same 4 other surgery. Any surgery has a risks of pain, infection, damage to neurovascular structures or worst of all, failure. In general arthroscopic surgeries have a lower rate of infection than similar open procedures. Arthroscopic surgery provides better visualization with less soft tissue damage. Typically the recovery is faster and there is less pain than with open procedures. Read more...

What are the risks associated with arthroscopic shoulder surgery?

Fairly Safe. General and regional anesthesia reactions, which are rare. Infections are extremely rare. Nerve injuries about the shoulder are rare. Persistent pain, stiffness and weakness are the most common. Therapy is a must after surgery to reduce these more common risks. Read more...
See list below. Risks of shoulder surgery include but are not limited to: incomplete relief of pain, incomplete return of function, infections, stiffness, crps, nerve injury: axillary nerve, brachial plexus, fluid extravasation, chondrolysis, hematoma, chondral injury / arthritis, dvt/pe. Read more...

How can I know if I really need to have arthroscopic shoulder surgery?

Talk to your surgeon. Talk to your orthopaedic surgeon who will give you both the non-operative treatment options and operative treatment options and the risks and benefits of each. If you are uncertain about a surgery, get a second opinion. Read more...
If failed therapy. For most shoulder injuries or conditions, surgery is an option, but only after an adequate amount of time has been allowed for the condition to resolve, and conservative treatment with physical therapy, anti-inflammatory medication and activity modification have been tried. However, surgery might be the best option for painful rotator cuff or cartilage tears, instability, or impingement. Read more...