4 doctors weighed in:
I have been diagnosed with "achalasia" and may require an operation. Why what how?
4 doctors weighed in

Dr. CHARLES TALAKKOTTUR
Internal Medicine
2 doctors agree
In brief: See below
Usually a long flexible tube is passed down the throat and in to the esophagus with a video camera so the GI doctor can visualize the problem on a tv screen.
It is not really an operation but a procedure. You will receive medicine so you fall asleep during the procedure. The doctor can sometimes inject Botox to help alleviate the problem.

In brief: See below
Usually a long flexible tube is passed down the throat and in to the esophagus with a video camera so the GI doctor can visualize the problem on a tv screen.
It is not really an operation but a procedure. You will receive medicine so you fall asleep during the procedure. The doctor can sometimes inject Botox to help alleviate the problem.
Dr. CHARLES TALAKKOTTUR
Dr. CHARLES TALAKKOTTUR
Thank
Dr. David Earle
Surgery
In brief: Achalasia
This is a disease where the nerves of the esophagus no longer function to coordinate the muscles to push down food, or send a signal to the lower valve of the esophagus at the entrance to the stomach to open an let the food in.
Cause usually unknown. Most effective and most invasive treatment is surgically cutting the muscle of the valve, that can be done laparoscopically or endoscopically (poem).

In brief: Achalasia
This is a disease where the nerves of the esophagus no longer function to coordinate the muscles to push down food, or send a signal to the lower valve of the esophagus at the entrance to the stomach to open an let the food in.
Cause usually unknown. Most effective and most invasive treatment is surgically cutting the muscle of the valve, that can be done laparoscopically or endoscopically (poem).
Dr. David Earle
Dr. David Earle
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Umesh Patel
Board Certified, Internal Medicine - Cardiology
38 years in practice
1M people helped
Continue
107,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors