What are trans fats?

Transformed veg. oil. Trans fat is what one gets by adding hydrogen to vegetable oil. The trans fat is more solid, less "oily", and makes junk food more stable for a longer time. Trans fat is bad because it raises a person's bad cholesterol, and lowers his good cholesterol, so it blocks up arteries worse than saturated fats do. Food labels that say "0 grams" trans fat mean "less than half a gram", not necessarily zero!
Bad for you. Meats have some transfats, but most are manmade. Transfats are made by hydrogenating oils, which turns them into solids (shortening). Transfats are used in processed foods b/c they last longer on shelf that way -- cookies/pie crusts/chips/popcorn/donuts/creamer/margarine. They raise LDL (bad) and lower HDL (good) cholesterol, which leads to heart disease. Saturated fats are just as bad!
CarbonChemistryLinks. The vast majority of c-c bonds: all fats: single. If c-c double bonds (unsaturated) are present ; converted to single bonds, aka saturated (no room for more hydrogen), the final linkage may be cis- or trans-; lookup google images of: "cis-fat vs. Trans-fat" all living cells do cis- under enzymatic control; industrial hydrogenation lacking control: ½ cis, ½ trans; trans-bonds foreign to our enzymes.

Related Questions

What are trans fats and processed foods? Why are they bad for the body?

Clogs the arteries. Trans-fats are created to make oils more solid and keep their flavor or texture longer in processed foods. The unfortunate thing is that trans-fats cause bad cholesterol-related problems, and clog up arteries, leading to heart disease, artery disease, or strokes. In recent years, food processing companies have taken much of the trans-fats out of their foods (but replaced them with other fats). Read more...
More than one issue. Trans fats are more atherogenic than mono and poly unsaturated fats and predispose to heart attacks and stroke. Processed foods are often high in fat and salt and low in fiber. Such foods promote obesity and high blood pressure, both risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Read more...
Atom-Atom Linkage. The issue is: when double bonds, between carbons, are converted to single, the bond spatial pattern. Lookup in google images: "cis-fat vs. Trans-fat". The vast majority of c-c bonds in fats, & other carbon backbone molecules, are single, aka saturated (no room for more hydrogen side groups). Living cells break double bonds to cis-bonds; industrial hydrogenation lacking control: ½ cis, ½ trans. Read more...
Heart disease. Meats have some transfats, but most are manmade. Transfats are made by hydrogenating oils, which turns them into solids (shortening). Transfats are used in processed foods b/c they last longer on shelf that way -- cookies/pie crusts/chips/popcorn/donuts/creamer/margarine. They raise LDL (bad) and lower HDL (good) cholesterol, which leads to heart disease. Saturated fats are just as bad! Read more...

What are trans fats and if they are so bad why do they have to put them I food?

Trans fats. Trans fats were created when manufacturers started turning liquid oils into solid fats -- like margarine -- as a substitute for the saturated fats in butter, cream, & meats that people thought caused heart disease. The process used is called hydrogenation. Later they realized that these products last longer before going rancid. So now, many foods contain this despite ill effects in humans. Read more...

What are trans fats and if they are so bad why do they have to put them I food?

Toxic oils. Most trans fats come from partially hydrogenated oils found in many processed & fried foods. They are used because they are cheap, taste good & extend shelf life. They cause inflammation, raise cholesterol & may cause up to 100, 000 deaths in the us from heart disease each year & also increase risk of alzheimer's disease, diabetes, obesity, depression & infertility. See my comment for some links. Read more...
LowerProcessingCosts. The issue is: when double bonds, between carbons, are converted to single, the bond spatial pattern. Lookup in google images: "cis-fat vs. Trans-fat". The vast majority of c-c bonds in fats, & other carbon backbone molecules, are single, aka saturated (no room for more hydrogen side groups). Living cells break double bonds to cis-bonds; industrial hydrogenation lacking control: ½ cis, ½ trans. Read more...

What is trans fat? Is it bad?

Blocks up arteries. Trans fat is what one gets by adding hydrogen to vegetable oil. The trans fat is more solid, less "oily", and makes junk food more stable for a longer time. Trans fat is bad because it raises a person's bad cholesterol, and lowers his good cholesterol, so it blocks up arteries worse than saturated fats do. Food labels that say "0 grams" trans fat mean "less than half a gram", not necessarily zero! Read more...
Fat not found Nature. The vast majority of c-c bonds in all fats are single, aka saturated (no room for more hydrogen side atoms). If double bonds (unsaturated) present & converted to single bonds by industrial hydrogenation lacking control: ½ cis, ½ trans. All living cells do cis- see google images ancel keys started & marketed the myth, 1953, that sat. Fats of natural origin unhealthy & helped drive this problem. Read more...
Hydrogenated oils. Meats have some transfats, but most are manmade. Transfats are made by hydrogenating oils, which turns them into solids (shortening). Transfats are used in processed foods b/c they last longer on shelf that way -- cookies/pie crusts/chips/popcorn/donuts/creamer/margarine. They raise LDL (bad) and lower HDL (good) cholesterol, which leads to heart disease. Saturated fats are just as bad! Read more...

What is trans fat and what foods in particular is it found in?

Trans. Refers to the particular chemistry of the carbon chain that makes up the molecule. Cis is the form for the essential fatty acids that we require .Unfortunately trans fatty acids are in a great number of "man made" foods and proprietary foods state the concentration of them on the label. Read more...
Baked goods. Meats have some transfats, but most are manmade. Transfats are made by hydrogenating oils, which turns them into solids (shortening). Transfats are used in processed foods b/c they last longer on shelf that way -- cookies/pie crusts/chips/popcorn/donuts/creamer/margarine. They raise LDL (bad) and lower HDL (good) cholesterol, which leads to heart disease. Saturated fats are just as bad! Read more...