What is done during rotator cuff repair/arthroscopic surgery?

Cuff sutured to bone. The rotator cuff is identified arthroscopically and instruments are used to suture the rotator cuff. These sutures are used to secure the rotator cuff to the bone. Some sutures are attached to anchors, the anchors are placed into the bone. The sutures are tied down to or impacted into the bone to complete the repair.
Repair the tendon. There are 4 muscles which make up the rotator cuff. The muscles are attached to bone by a tendon, which we refer to as the cuff. With a tear, the tendon pulls away from the bone. Surgery will repair the cuff back to the bone. This can usually be done through arthroscopic surgery and small incisions.

Related Questions

Can you suffer a neck injury as a result of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery in a beach chair?

Positional stiffness. Positional stiffness can occur during any surgical procedure, to include neck pain/stiffness from arthroscopic shoulder surgery performed in the beach chair (sitting) position. Read more...

I suffered a neck injury as a result of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery in a beach chair. What can I do?

Time to get checked. Hopefully, your injury was simply muscle strain related to positioning that improves with physical therapy. However more significant injuries have been associated with the beach chair position including disc injuries because the position requires a head holder to maintain your head during the procedure. I. Read more...

How long does arthroscopic surgery on your rotator cuff take to heal?

Arthroscopy. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs do not heal faster than mini open or open rrotator cuff procedures arthroscopic had advantages of less initial pain and ability to view entire shoulder for additional pathology. Read more...
2-3 months to heal. And up to 6 months to be fully recovered. If the rotator cuff tear is significant, sometimes longer. Read more...

After arthroscopic surgery on rotator cuff is it normal to have severe pain in the elbow and stabbing feeling in hand?

Post op pain. No, but is is unlikely do to the surgery itself. Is it the forth and fifth fingers? If so i would highly suspect a ulnar neuropathy. This nerve is located where we call the funny bone. It can cause pain in the elbow and hand. Ask your orthopedist to evaluate. Read more...

Do I need arthroscopy or open surgery? My doctor thinks I have torn my rotator cuff and is referring me to an orthopedic surgeon. Can my injury be repaired with arthroscopy, or will I need an open surgery?

Hello: Arthroscopic . Hello: arthroscopic rotator cuff repair technique does offer some advantages, but so does the open technique in other ways. For many years, before the "toys" necessary for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were invented and implemented (suture anchors, strong sutures, suture passing devices), open was the way to go. Over the past ten to 15 years arthroscopic pioneers have refined the tools and techniques so that now it is very feasible to do cuff repairs arthroscopically for those surgeons interested to learn and spend the time to do these repairs. My personal belief is that the arthroscopic technique offers more advantages than downsides in my hands, so that's my technique of choice if I am to do my best for my patient. Another surgeon may feel differently, and that's perfectly legitimate. The most important thing is still your rapport with the surgeon: meet the surgeon and see if you feel comfortable with him/her and feel confident in the surgeon's command of the condition and the answers to your questions. If you do feel comfortable, that is a far more important indication of a good way to go than to pick surgeons based on techniques first. Read more...
Arthroscopic repair. Most common shoulder conditions can be addressed thru an arthroscopic procedure with minimally incisions and most importantly proper rehabilitation postoperative. A large tear may at times require an open approach but this is occasional. Your rotator cuff can be repaired based upon your clinical examination and MRI imaging thru an arthroscopic approach. Read more...
Arthroscopy RC. If you truly have a torn rotator cuff and you are relatively active and not bedridden you should get it fixed. In other words most of the time we do fix them. Arthroscopy has become the primary means of fixing rotator cuffs. A sport medicine or shoulder orthopaedist can help you with this. Surgery is typically outpatient takes 45 minutes to 1.5 hours. Recovery is 3-4 months. Read more...

I have had 2 rotator cuff repair surgeries and each time during pt it was retorn. Now its worse than ever. Now what!

Some don't heal. Some cuff tears are irreparable for a variety of reasons. It might surprise you to find out that a high percentage of large cuff tears either do not heal or re-tear. If it gave way during therapy 2 times, then it was not likely to heal in the first place. Symptomatic care is best for now with therapy and the occasional injection, reverse shoulder replacement if things worsen. Read more...
Recurrent cuff tear. If you have had two failed rotator cuff repairs, your options are 1. Tendon graft, either autograft or allograft. 2. Tendon transfers. 3. Reverse total shoulder replacement. 4 shoulder arthrodesis. Read more...

What can I expect from a rotator cuff repair surgery on the left shoulder?

Rest. A rotator cuff repair takes the torn end of the rotator cuff tendon and reattaches it to the bone with anchors and or sutures. The repair takes from 30 minutes to 2 hours. A period of rest after the surgery allows the tendon end to heal back to the bone. This can take between 6-12 weeks. Typically, you are given some rest, followed by gentle exercises for motion and strength. Read more...
4-12 Months Recovery. Learn more here: http://www.Theshouldercenter.Com/rotator-cuff-tear.Htm http://www.Theshouldercenter.Com/video-how-to-choose-a-surgeon-for-your-rotator-cuff-repair.Htm. Read more...