16 doctors weighed in:
Can I give my toddler multiple over-the-counter medications at once?
16 doctors weighed in

Dr. Chad Rudnick
Pediatrics
4 doctors agree
In brief: Wait
This very much depends on what medications you are giving, why you are giving them, and whether or not your pediatrician knows about and concurs with their use.
Just because a medication is over-the-counter does NOT make it safe for toddlers. Before starting any treatment regimen, even if over-the-counter, always consult with your pediatrician.

In brief: Wait
This very much depends on what medications you are giving, why you are giving them, and whether or not your pediatrician knows about and concurs with their use.
Just because a medication is over-the-counter does NOT make it safe for toddlers. Before starting any treatment regimen, even if over-the-counter, always consult with your pediatrician.
Dr. Chad Rudnick
Dr. Chad Rudnick
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1 comment
Dr. Nayyara Dawood
OTC medications now carry the instruction to check with the doctor before using the medications on small children.This is a general professional advice limited to USA patients based on information provided and is to be verified by a Physician familiar with the patient
Dr. Natalie Hodge
Pediatrics
2 doctors agree
In brief: No
This really depends on what ingredients are in the OTC medication.
I usually have parents use Motrin for fever or pain. Use DM only preparations for cough. And that's about it. The combination medicines, especially ones that combine fever reducer WITH cold meds, are confusing to use, dont recommend the proper dosing and invariably I have seen overdoses in these.

In brief: No
This really depends on what ingredients are in the OTC medication.
I usually have parents use Motrin for fever or pain. Use DM only preparations for cough. And that's about it. The combination medicines, especially ones that combine fever reducer WITH cold meds, are confusing to use, dont recommend the proper dosing and invariably I have seen overdoses in these.
Dr. Natalie Hodge
Dr. Natalie Hodge
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Dr. Kevin Windisch
Pediatrics
2 doctors agree
In brief: No
There are very few over-the-counter medications for children under 4 years of age.
Most of them don't help any way. With the exception of tylenol (acetaminophen) or motrin, i wouldn't use any OTC meds in a toddler.

In brief: No
There are very few over-the-counter medications for children under 4 years of age.
Most of them don't help any way. With the exception of tylenol (acetaminophen) or motrin, i wouldn't use any OTC meds in a toddler.
Dr. Kevin Windisch
Dr. Kevin Windisch
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Dr. Diane Minich
Family Medicine
1 doctor agrees
In brief: No
you need t check with the doctor before giving any Cold medications do work in young children and they are often overdosed.

In brief: No
you need t check with the doctor before giving any Cold medications do work in young children and they are often overdosed.
Dr. Diane Minich
Dr. Diane Minich
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Dr. Scott Katz
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Yes
Yes, but it depends which medications.
You should always check with your pediatrician before giving your infant any medication. If they are needing more than one, they probably need to be examined.

In brief: Yes
Yes, but it depends which medications.
You should always check with your pediatrician before giving your infant any medication. If they are needing more than one, they probably need to be examined.
Dr. Scott Katz
Dr. Scott Katz
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Dr. Cory Annis
Internal Medicine & Pediatrics
In brief: No
Over-the-counter does not mean "safe".
It simply means "without a prescription." mixing medicines without consulting your pediatrician is a really risky idea, especially cold medications. Exceptions might be Benadryl (diphenhydramine) and Ibuprofen for a local bee sting reaction, but consult with your doctors office. This might be ok for everybody's kid but yours, for some reason.

In brief: No
Over-the-counter does not mean "safe".
It simply means "without a prescription." mixing medicines without consulting your pediatrician is a really risky idea, especially cold medications. Exceptions might be Benadryl (diphenhydramine) and Ibuprofen for a local bee sting reaction, but consult with your doctors office. This might be ok for everybody's kid but yours, for some reason.
Dr. Cory Annis
Dr. Cory Annis
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Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics
In brief: Yes
It is safe to occasionally use tylenol (acetaminophen) or Motrin for toddlers who have fever, pain, or other discomfort (such as fussiness after vaccinations).
If a toddler has more symptoms (such as allergies, hives, constipation) treatable by over-the-counter medications, parents should call the doctor to confirm the safety of giving such medicines, before giving the medicines to the child for the first time.

In brief: Yes
It is safe to occasionally use tylenol (acetaminophen) or Motrin for toddlers who have fever, pain, or other discomfort (such as fussiness after vaccinations).
If a toddler has more symptoms (such as allergies, hives, constipation) treatable by over-the-counter medications, parents should call the doctor to confirm the safety of giving such medicines, before giving the medicines to the child for the first time.
Dr. Robert Kwok
Dr. Robert Kwok
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Dr. Paul Trani
Pediatrics
In brief: No
I wouldn't recommend it.
Over-the-counter medication manufacturers don't test their medicines together with other over-the-counter medicines. It's best to check with your medical provider to make certain that you're not over-dosing your child with something.

In brief: No
I wouldn't recommend it.
Over-the-counter medication manufacturers don't test their medicines together with other over-the-counter medicines. It's best to check with your medical provider to make certain that you're not over-dosing your child with something.
Dr. Paul Trani
Dr. Paul Trani
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Dr. Pamela Lindor
Pediatrics
In brief: No
Many OTC medications contain several ingredients.
Giving more than one at a time risks overdose or interactions. Otc cough and cold medications should not be used for children, unless specifically recommended by your doctor.

In brief: No
Many OTC medications contain several ingredients.
Giving more than one at a time risks overdose or interactions. Otc cough and cold medications should not be used for children, unless specifically recommended by your doctor.
Dr. Pamela Lindor
Dr. Pamela Lindor
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