Is inflammatory bowel disease an inherited condition?

Sometimes. There are genetic factors to inflammatory bowel disease (ibd) and individuals with a first degree family member with ibd have a higher risk of developing ibd in their lifetime. The overall risk is still fairly low (in the 10% range).

Related Questions

How can I treat inflammatory bowel disease?

Various medication. The two most common inflammatory bowel disease are ulcerative colitis and crohns disease. After diagnosis by your GI doctor, you will be recommended to take Asacol (mesalamine) or its variants and may require steroids and some higher order anti-inflammatories. Do not take Aspirin or nsaids which can worsen the problem. These are chronic diseases which flare up and down. Read more...
Medications. Variety of medications that will try to down regulate the inappropriate immune response found in ibd. Mesalamine (ie 5asa) products are a mainstay for uc and crohn's colitis. Other medications include immunosuppresant agents such as 6mp, immuran as well as biologic agents such as remicdae or humira (adalimumab). Steroids such as Prednisone are used in severe flares, but a not a long term option. Read more...

How would I know if I had inflammatory bowel disease?

Sometimes it is. Difficult for doctors, even specialists, to determine if you have it or not. So it would be even more difficult for you to figure out on your own. Typical symptoms of crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis would be unexplained abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fevers, weight loss. It is unpredicatable. Go see a GI specialist. Read more...
Common symptoms . Include abdominal pain/cramping , bloody mucoid stool , diarrhea, fever, weight loss, anemia etc. Most common examples of ibd are crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis . Cause is unknown, but certain environmental and genetic factors can contribute to the illness. U can check the link below for more info. Read more...

Can changing what I eat help control inflammatory bowel disease?

With flares, but... Ulcerative colitis involves inflammation of the colonic mucosal surface, so colectomy (removal of the colon) is curative for it. Crohn's disease however is a transmural (full-thickness) inflammation of any part of the GI tract (from mouth to anus). Crohn's is not curable, but it is controllable with medications (see my previous healthtap answer regarding "step up" versus "top down" treatments. Read more...
Yes. Sugar and oil aggravates symptoms. Make sure you substitute sugar with honey, oil from vegetable or canola to olive or coconut oil. Daily take phosphatidyl choline, galactan and devil's claw will heal gut. Read more...
It may help.. With symptoms especially during flares but unlikely to change the course of disease. The exception is severe cases of cd where elemental diets may help induce remission. Read more...

I'm concerned. What symptoms go with inflammatory bowel disease?

Cramps diarrhea. Symptoms vary from patient to patient, but most have some sort of abdominal pain - usiually cramping and loose, frequent bowel movements. Sometimes fever, sometimes blood in the stool, frequently weight loss if the symptoms are bad enough. See your doctor because many of these symptoms are nonspecific. Read more...
Variable. Multiple loose watery stools, often with blood up to7-15 times per day, loss of appetite, diffuse abdominal pain, weight loss that was not intentional, fever. If in doubt see either a colorectal surgeon or gastroenterologist. Read more...

What is inflammatory bowel disease?

IBD defined. Earlier healthtap answers may help. Briefly ibd is a spectum of inflammatory diseases of GI tract. At one end of the spectrum is ulcerative colitis---a disease confined to the mucosal surface of colon. At the opposite end of the spectrum is crohn's disease--a transmural (full thickness) inflammation of any part of GI tract (from mouth to anus). Both are systemic & increase colon cancer risk. Read more...
Various. Inflammatory bowel disease is most commonly considered to be either crohn's disease which can inflame any part of the intestine from mouth to anus, or ulcerative colitis which can inflame the colon. Both can cause abdominal cramping pains, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, rectal bleeding, etc. Read more...

Who gets an inflammatory bowel disease?

Almost anyone. About 15% of close relatives of crohn's patients carry genes that predispose to this inflammatory bowel disease. Also, ethnic origin and environment (including infectious and antigenic exposure as well as tobacco) play roles in disease emergence and "flaring." keep in mind that ibd can present in young, middle aged, or elderly, and almost anywhere and in any population around the world. Read more...

How is inflammatory bowel disease cured?

Cure for IBD? Ulcerative colitis involves inflammation of the colonic mucosal surface, so colectomy (removal of the colon) is curative for it. Crohn's disease however is a transmural (full-thickness) inflammation of any part of the GI tract (from mouth to anus). Crohn's is not curable, but it is controllable with medications (see my previous healthtap answer regarding "step up" versus "top down" treatments. Read more...
Maintain remission. Ibd is a chronic illness like diabetes and hypertension. There is no cure to crohn's disease and the only cure for ulcerative colitis is a total colectomy. The key is maintaining remission with the proper medications. Read more...