Does exercise help with a hiatal hernia?

Indirectly, at best. A hiatal hernia, by definition, is an enlarged opening in the diaphragm muscle that separates the chest from abdominal cavity. It is often used interchangeably with gerd; while often both present, they are distinctly separate diseases. Exercise may indirectly help gerd by leading to weight loss but it will not improve the anatomical abnormality of a hiatal hernia.
No effect . Exercise cannot improve the anatomical defect of a hiatal hernia. However losing weight, if overweight or obese, may lessen reflux though the hiatal hernia through lesser external presssure.

Related Questions

Is it possible to develop a hiatal hernia from exercise?

No. But exercises that increase the pressure in your abdomen (crunches) may exacerbate the symptoms of your hernia. Read more...
Not really. While exercise alone in rare circumstances may cause or make a hiatal hernia worse, there are many factors at play such as genetics, normal aging process, and medical conditions such as obesity that also may contribute. Read more...
Hiatal hernia. Not likely, though you can exacerbate the symptoms of a hiatal hernia with strenuous exercise. Straining increases your intaabdominal pressure which can push the stomach up into the chest through an existing hiatal hernia and cause symptoms. Read more...

I believe that I have a hiatal hernia due to the symptoms I have, what can I do to get rid of it? Also, can I do regular exercise i.E. Gym work.

Need an exam. You cannot tell what you may have by symptoms alone, and a significant hiatal hernia would be unlikely at age 18. Need to see a doctor for an exam. May be acid reflux, gastritis, etc. Do not go by feelings or symptoms alone. Also see a doctor before a major change in an exersice program. Read more...
Not likely. Your gastric symptoms should be treated by medications to reduce acid in the stomach. Only severe hiatal hernia symptoms need surgical repair. Most of them can be managed by lifestyle changes (weight loss, cessation of tobacco and alcohol, regular exercise etc). Gym should be fine. Hopefully you have had an upper endoscopy and xray studies to make an accurate diagnosis. Read more...

I am 34 and have a hiatal hernia. I drink alcohol occasionally. I watch my diet and exercise gas and bloating have increased. Why? Soothing remedies?

See your doctor. Increased gas and bloating are symptoms of malabsorption, generally. This can be multifactorial, i.e. Related to diet, stomach, gallbladder or pancreatic disease, or a host of other issues. Sometimes over the counter products containing mylicon can be of some help, but i would recommend a thorough evaluation with your primary doctor and perhaps upper endoscopy (egd). Read more...
Worsening hiatal her. The symptoms you describe of gas and bloating may indicate that you are swallowing more air (not under your control). If the stomach is sitting in a certain position it may make it difficult for it to empty out and thus the symptoms of gas and bloating. Try not to eat anything at night about 2 hrs prior to going to sleep, this may help. Read more...

Can a acupuncture help with a hiatal hernia?

No. A hiatal hernia is an enlargement of the normal hole in the diaphragm muscle through which the esophagus passes to enter into the abdominal cavity. Acupuncture would have no effect on this anatomical abnormality. Read more...
Absolutely not. A hernia is an anatomical pathology. Acupuncture may cause release of endorphins to make one feel better but it is not going to correct a hiatal hernia. Read more...
Hiatal hernia. I agree with the previous responders. Auricular acupuncture can be used to treat some symptoms related to a hernia but it can not fix a hernia. If you believe you have a hiatal hernia - please seek surgical evaluation. Read more...

What is hiatal hernia?

Hernia in diaphragm. A hiatal hernia is a hernia in the diaphragm. The diaphragm is a muscle separating your chest from your abdomen. There is a natural hole where your esophagus passes through from your chest into your abdmoen. If the hole enlarges, the stomach can come up through the hole and into your chest. This is a hiatal hernia. Read more...
A hole in diaphragm. A hiatal hernia is when a part of the stomach comes up through a hole in the diaphragm into the chest. The diaphragm is a thin muscle that helps us breath and separates the chest cavity from the abdominal cavity. The most common type of hiatal hernia can cause reflux or heartburn. This is treated with medication and sometimes laparoscopic or endoscopic surgery. Read more...
Hiatal hernia. A hiatal hernia is a laxity or defect of the diaphragm where the esophagus travels through the back of the chest into the abdominal cavity and your stomach. Some patients have heartburn associated with hiatal hernias while some do not. Read more...
See below. The esophageal hiatus is an anatomical feature traversed by the esophagus on its way from the chest to the abdomen. When muscles and ligaments that define the boundaries of the hiatus weaken or become lax, the upper stomach may transiently or permanently reside in the chest. This is a hiatal hernia. Uncommonly, the entire stomach or other organs (colon, small bowel, spleen) may herniate as well. . Read more...

What is a hiatal hernia?

Hole in diaphragm. The diaphragm is the muscle that separates the chest- from the abdominal cavity. Many structures have to go thru the diaphragm in order to enter into the abdominal cavity, including the esophagus, the aorta, and the vena cava. The hiatus is the hole in the diaphragm thru which the esophagus passes. This can enlarge, allowing the stomach to "yo-yo" up into the chest: this is called a hiatal hernia. Read more...
Enlarged hiatus. A hiatal hernia is a hernia through the diaphragm. The natural opening where the esophagus comes through the diaphragm enlarges. Sometimes it gets big enough that a significant amount of stomach can get through the hole into the chest. This may or may not be related to reflux disease, which is the most common symptom associated with hiatal hernias. Read more...
See below. The esophageal hiatus is an anatomical feature traversed by the esophagus on its way from the chest to the abdomen. When muscles and ligaments that define the boundaries of the hiatus weaken or become lax, the upper stomach may transiently or permanently reside in the chest. This is a hiatal hernia. Uncommonly, the entire stomach or other organs (colon, small bowel, spleen) may herniate as well. . Read more...