3 doctors weighed in:
Can breathing mold spores cause you to get lymphoma or other cancers?
3 doctors weighed in

Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Probably not
A huge amount of study has gone into both the effect of inhaling mold spores (which range from harmless to serious), and to the epidemiology of malignant lymphoma.
Nobody's made a connection. One mystery is why non-hodgkin's lymphomas are becoming more common -- since mold's been with us for ages, it seems unlikely that this is the answer to the puzzle.

In brief: Probably not
A huge amount of study has gone into both the effect of inhaling mold spores (which range from harmless to serious), and to the epidemiology of malignant lymphoma.
Nobody's made a connection. One mystery is why non-hodgkin's lymphomas are becoming more common -- since mold's been with us for ages, it seems unlikely that this is the answer to the puzzle.
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Dr. Ed Friedlander
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Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Radiation Oncology
In brief: Not carcinogenic
But allergy, and at times as with aspergilla, semi-invasive to frankly invasive.
The allergy produces wheezing and can be quite serious. Cavities/bullae infected with aspergilla can produce hemorrhage and may require resection.

In brief: Not carcinogenic
But allergy, and at times as with aspergilla, semi-invasive to frankly invasive.
The allergy produces wheezing and can be quite serious. Cavities/bullae infected with aspergilla can produce hemorrhage and may require resection.
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Thank
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Dr. Aaron Milstone
Board Certified, Internal Medicine - Pulmonology
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