6 doctors weighed in:

I didn't mention, my CT scan in 2008 said fatty liver but mass lesion is difficult to exclude, 2012 , it said liver does not show any definite lesion?

6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Charles Cattano
Internal Medicine - Gastroenterology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Fatty liver common

Fatty liver occurs in about 1/4 of americans, & correlates with obesity, elevated cholesterol, diabetes, significant alcohol intake.
Fatty liver can progress to cirrhosis, so patients with fatty liver (especially if abnormal liver tests) really need to: stop drinking, lose weight, control their sugar & cholesterol. So far so good with your x-ray in that tumors are not described on current films.

In brief: Fatty liver common

Fatty liver occurs in about 1/4 of americans, & correlates with obesity, elevated cholesterol, diabetes, significant alcohol intake.
Fatty liver can progress to cirrhosis, so patients with fatty liver (especially if abnormal liver tests) really need to: stop drinking, lose weight, control their sugar & cholesterol. So far so good with your x-ray in that tumors are not described on current films.
Dr. Charles Cattano
Dr. Charles Cattano
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Dr. Allen Seely
General Practice
2 doctors agree

In brief: GOOD NEWS

If abdomen ct scan was with contrast (iv and oral) and 'no definite liver lesion' seen then good news for you! did the fatty liver resolve also? Then double the good news!

In brief: GOOD NEWS

If abdomen ct scan was with contrast (iv and oral) and 'no definite liver lesion' seen then good news for you! did the fatty liver resolve also? Then double the good news!
Dr. Allen Seely
Dr. Allen Seely
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Dr. Bac Nguyen
Family Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Picture quality and

Significant fatty deposition in the liver affects the ct image quality and thus things may not be clearly seen.
Ct/mri are good imaging techniques, but they are not perfect and at times artifacts can produce poor picture, worse with patient movement etc...At times causing shadow and thus "mass lesion is difficult to exclude" but now picture is likely a better one, thus no lesion seen! good news.

In brief: Picture quality and

Significant fatty deposition in the liver affects the ct image quality and thus things may not be clearly seen.
Ct/mri are good imaging techniques, but they are not perfect and at times artifacts can produce poor picture, worse with patient movement etc...At times causing shadow and thus "mass lesion is difficult to exclude" but now picture is likely a better one, thus no lesion seen! good news.
Dr. Bac Nguyen
Dr. Bac Nguyen
Thank
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