Are dizziness and vertigo symptoms of cervical myelopathy?

No unlikely. No they are not direct symptoms but if the cervical myleopathy is due to cord compression related to advanced degenerative changes, sometimes these changes can affect the vascular channels where the vertebral arteries are passing through and they may have blood flow impaired causing these symptoms. You can get a mra to evaluate this as part of a work up by your doctor for these symptoms.

Related Questions

Help please! Is dizziness and vertigo a symptom of cervical myelopathy?

Myelopathy. No. Ataxia, or a staggering walk akin to being drunk without alcohol is typical. Coordination problems--trouble writing, buttoning buttons, discerning coins in your pocket. Spastic reflexes or muscle twitches. Weakness in hands, numbness like stockings and gloves. These symptoms may progress to loss of walking very gradually, almost unnoticed until too late. Read more...

Can cervical myelopathy lead to disabilities?

Yes! It can be quite disabling. While it may be mild and not progress (get worse), it often does worsen. If it continues, it can lead to paralysis of the arms and legs (tetraplegia, quadriplegia). See a spinal specialist or neurologist for evaluation and treatment options. Do not ignore myelopathy. Read more...
Yes. By definition, a cervical myelopathy is a condition that causes compression of the spinal cord in the neck. The symptoms of cervical myelopathy can be weakness in upper limbs in particular but can also cause weakness in the legs as well. In the upper limbs, one can see muscle wasting, particularly in the hands. Severe cord compression can cause problems with the bowels and bladder. See a doc. Read more...
Yes. This condition can lead to significant physical impairments that may lead to disabilities depending on the extent of neurologic involvement and on an occupational level depending on the type of occupation and one's educational level and the ability to modify one's duties if at all based on the physical impairments. Depression related to this pathology is not uncommon. Read more...

How common is it for somebody to get cervical myelopathy?

Not so common. Cervical myelopathy is a condtion of the neck where spurs cause narrowing of the spinal canal with injury to the spinal cord. Sometimes this is reversible and other times it is permanent. It does not occur that often. This is a condition requiring surgery as the spinal canal must be restored to a normal caliber. If not, paralysis can occur. Read more...
Pretty common. It is fairly common, though not as common as neck pain without nerve type symptoms or radiculopathy (arm pain, numbness, tingling, weakness due to irritation or pressure on a nerve rather than the spinal cord itself). Read more...

Help docs! I'm trying to find out what causes cervical myelopathy?

Compression. Cervical myelopathy is most often caused by compression on the cervical spinal cord. This can occur acutely, for example, after a ruptured herniated disc or if there is a blood clot. This can also occur slowly over time as the patient develops spinal stenosis or narrowing of the spinal canal. This leads to "squeezing" of the spinal cord and the symptoms of myelopathy. Read more...

Any surgical tratment for spasticity due to cervical myelopathy?

Maybe. If the spinal cord becomes compressed or damaged by progressive degeneration, then surgery is usually mandatory to prevent further damage. If the myelopathy is due to problems such as ms or underlying medical problems, surgery is not anticipated to benefit. Knowing the underlying cause, allows therapeutic decision making. Read more...
Possible. If the spasticity is due to myleopathy secondary to spinal cord compression , relieving the compression will prevent any symptom progression and may or may not relieve any existing findings or symptoms. Read more...

What is cervical myelopathy and how doe sit effect your reflexes?

Spinal cord problem. It is a problem with the spinal cord. A common cause is pressure from disk, bone spurs or soft tissues around the cord. Some reflexes are weakened, but most of them are increased. The person with myelopathy may notice this because the muscles are spastic (contract on their own, tight) and/or weak. Read more...

What has been the experience with a cervical myelopathy surgery for the spine.?

Usually good. It depends on the severity of the pressure, how long it has been there, if there has been spinal cord damage. Usually decompression keeps myelopathy from worsening. The condition usually improves unless there is severe damage to the cord before something is done. An experienced spine surgeon can give prognosis in a given person. Read more...
It is indicated. When diagnosed secondary to cord compression, it will get worse without surgery but this progression varies from patient to patient. Surgery is indicated to prevent progression but it is unpredictable as to extent of recovery but the earlier it is diagnosed with the least objective findings and symptoms, the better the prognosis. Cord changes on imaging also tend to suggest a worse prognosis. Read more...

What has been the experience/results after a cervical myelopathy surgery for the spine?

Generally ok. For this diagnosis, surgery will prevent a progression of the myleopathy but does not mean that whatever neurologic functions that have been affected will recover if at all. Recovery is variable as well if at all ranging from complete resolution of symptoms to no resolution to everything in between. Once diagnosed, it is best to treat it before it progresses based on the unpredictable recovery. Read more...