What causes neonatal jaundice in breastfed baby?

Depends,often normal. Mild jaundice is common & results from the baby's GI system just maturing & being able to excrete bilirubin. This happens when the liver becomes more functional during the first week or so of life. As the baby feeds, bilirubin leaves the body in the stool (hence yellow stools) & urine. If breastmilk is not yet in, more jaundice may occur. In other babies, it can be due to more serious conditions.

Related Questions

What causes most neonatal jaundice?

Jaundice. Most physiologic neonatal jaundice is caused by immaturity of the liver and inability to process all of the breakdown products of red blood cells leading to a build up of bilirubin. This may be exacerbated in breast fed infants. There are causes of neonatal jaundice that can represent disease states, but these are not the most n cause of neonatal jaindice. Read more...

Does neonatal jaundice usually cause many symptoms?

Yellow skin. Most common cause of jaundice is physiologic , which usually causes yellowish discoloration of skin and eyes and usually mild. Newborn jaundice caused due to reasons like blood type mismatch between mother and baby, congenital abnormalities of liver or biliary tract, congenital or acquired infections in newborn or bleeding beneath scalp can also poor feeding , tiredness and lead to kernicterus. Read more...
A few. Jaundice cause a yellow discoloration to skin and conjunctiva. It can cause irritablity, lethargy and poor feeding. In the severe cases, when the bilirubin crosses the blood/brain barrier, it can cause permanent neurological insult. Read more...

I have a hh agency (new), peds & just had first time request for light therapy for newborn jaundice infant. What complications are there?

See below. Blue light therapy for jaundice is standard for breaking down the bilirubin that is being produced and seen in the skin and sclera. As long as the child's eyes are protected and hydration is monitored along with the bilirubin levels (by a health care professional), i fore see no complications as long as the bilirubin level is lowering and the child is not sick as well. Read more...
Light therapy . If the baby has cholestatic jaundice there is risk of "bronze baby" syndrome (they turn a dark gray color). If the baby has congenital erythropoietic porphyria they can develop blisters. (ask family history). Otherwise unless the family doesn't feed or change the baby while under lights the bigger risk is of not treating the jaundice. Read more...

Got a baby daughter 17days old now. She had neonatal jaundice at 17.9 points. We got her photo therapy for 36 hours and levels came to 12.

Treatment/Management. The trend is in the right direction, and normalizing. Keeping your daughter hydrated will help the process. If you notice any jaundice or yellow tinge to her sclerae ( the white area of the eye ), a follow up level should be obtained. Congratulations on her birth, and the vast majority of infants who are treated with phototherapy for jaundice do very well. Read more...

What can I do to prevent neonatal jaundice?

You don't. This is a transient issue with as many as a 3rd of newborns. It is usually mild and self corrects. Have the OB monitor your pregnancy and deal with issues like rh disease that would be a problem, and take the Rhogam injection if needed.Other influences can be managed at the time between you and your pediatrician.Needs vary with each individual case. Read more...

In neonatal jaundice what's the treatment?

Neonatal jaundice. Phototherapy is the primary treatment in neonates with unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. This therapeutic principle was discovered rather serendipitously in england in the 1950s and is now arguably the most widespread therapy of any kind (excluding prophylactic treatments) used in newborns. Read more...
Phototherapy. In neonates, the primary treatment is light therapy (phototherapy). The jaundice is diagnosed by the high level of a substance called unconjugated bilirubin in the newborn’s blood. There is no standard amount of time the infant should be treated with phototherapy -- it’s all dependant on the baby’s bilirubin level falling below a certain threshold (13-14 mg/dL). Read more...

When should we do phototherapy in neonatal jaundice.

Doctor's call. Jaundice phototherapy management is a doctor's decision which follows by the AAP guidelines and VK Bhutani's curve. It depends on the infant's assessment: his clinical status, underlying conditions (e.g. sepsis), inherited diseases (e.g. G6PD), gestational age (lower treatment threshold for the more premature), hours or days of infant's life, bilirubin fractions, albumin level, blood type, DAT. Read more...

Which treatment works the best and fastest for neonatal jaundice?

Depends. Often it requires no treatment whatsoever. Frequent breastfeeding and exposure to sunlight may suffice. If bilirubin levels are in the "high" zone and most importantly they are rising, your baby may need so called "light therapy" when he/she is put under uv light to remove excessive bilirubin in the system. Read more...
Phototherapy. If treatment is needed the best treatment is phototherapy, which is light therapy using special lamps or lighted blankets and exposing skin to them. Also one has to ensure proper nutrition and hydration. The fastest treatment is blood exchange transfusion but this is used only in very rare situations when jaundice is very severe and putting at risk baby's brain. Read more...

My daughter had severe neonatal jaundice. She is now 17 and has lots of cavities. Is there a direct link between the two?

Don't think so. Cavities are probably due to a combination of sugars/acids in the diet, lack of fluoride while teeth were developing, compromised oral hygiene, and irregular professional care. Have the cavities (infections) treated immediately. Discuss diet, oral hygiene, and fluoride rinses with the Dentist to prevent recurrence. Read more...