After hip replacement do you have to learn to walk all over again?

No. After hip replacement, physical therapy is indicated. The patient will need help and guidance getting range of motion, strength, and endurance back. However, the need is not as dramatic as having to learn how to walk again.
No. Usually you will stand at the bedside and take a few small steps the day of surgery. The next day you will walk as you always do, but with a walker or crutches, and assistance, to ensure that you do not fall. Strength and "normal walking" return naturally, and are aided by physical therapy.

Related Questions

Grandma going to go in for a hip replacement. How long before will she be able to walk again?

Usually the next day. After uncomplicated hip replacements, physical therapy will start with patient the next day, walking and other exercises. I usually push for sitting, or standing at the bedside the evening of surgery. Normal walking patterns return between 2 to 6 weeks. Read more...

If you've had a hip replacement, how long does it take to walk again?

1 days. Unless there was a fracture or other reason to not get up and out of bed, most people are out of bed and walking the first day after surgery. Recovery tends to occur at a rate of 8% to 10% a week, so at 5 to 6 weeks you should be about 50% to 60% better and moving from a walker to a cane. At 2 months you should be 80% to 90% better and off the cane and walking with a minimal limp. Read more...
One day. Almost all of our patients walk the day of surgery or the next morning with a walker or crutches. Most can walk without a cane or walker by six weeks after the surgery. Read more...

Will I still be able to walk if my hip replacement was dislocated?

No. The dislocation of the hip would cause severe pain, shortening of the leg, and an in ability to walk normally. Read more...
No. A dislocation of a prosthetic hip is a very painful event. You will not be able to walk or move the hip without significant pain. A dislocated hip requires a manual reduction, usually done in an emergency room setting. Read more...

I had a total hip replacement 5 weeks ago and cannot walk or stand. Is that ok?

Possibly not. Most hip replacements done today are set up to walk and stand on immediately after surgery. While every patient recovers at a different rate, being unable to stand would be concerning to me as your surgeon. The soft tissues, your strength, and the stability of the components should be assessed by your surgeon. It may be something as simple as more physical therapy, which your doctor can order. Read more...
Something is wrong. If you cannot walk or stand, literally, there is a problem. Have your doctor get an xray and tell you what is going on. Read more...

Can a person have spurs in back? My brother has pains when he walk, he initially was told he needed hip replacement. After further tests, his doctor said he had some spurs on in his back which was causing pain.

Yes . Yes a person can have spurs on the bones that make up the spine (vertebrae). Another name for bone spurs is osteophytes. Bone spurs are enlargements of an area of the bone. They can cause pain when they push against other tissue and structures in the body. Read more...
As . As the spine wears out, the disk, joints, ligaments and capsules weaken and develop increased movement called instability. As a response to instability, the body thickens ligaments and forms bone spurs to decrease abnormal movements. The bone spurs can pinch the nerves going to the leg causing leg pain. Initial treatment is usually physical therapy and steroid injections. If this does not help then surgery would be the next consideration. Surgery involves removal of the bone spurs to take the pressure off the nerves. Please see my health guide on bone spurs for more information. Good luck! Read more...

My back hurts....Could it be my bed...When I walk I feel it in my hip....My dad had a hip replacement...Is that genetic?

Several questions. You've asked several questions! back pain at your age is generally benign and will almost always respond to basic conservative treatment - physical therapy, increased activity, exercise, good diet, etc. The bed gets blamed a lot but in truth, as long as you have a decent medium firm mattress, it's fine. Hip replacement is usually done for arthritis which is a normal aging change. Read more...