12 doctors weighed in:
My mom is in the final stage of her terminal cancer. Basically we're providing her with palliative care at home. She started mumbling and moaning a lot last night. Its quite disturbing but she's not in pain. However everytime she falls asleep it happens.
12 doctors weighed in

Dr. Anthony Back
Internal Medicine - Oncology
5 doctors agree
In brief: Call the hospice nur
While some patients do moan in the last phase of life, i would ask the hospice nurse to assess her to see if you should try some extra pain medicine.
Sometimes moaning is a non-verbal sign of pain, or delirium--both treatable conditions. But you probably need an experienced person to look at her.

In brief: Call the hospice nur
While some patients do moan in the last phase of life, i would ask the hospice nurse to assess her to see if you should try some extra pain medicine.
Sometimes moaning is a non-verbal sign of pain, or delirium--both treatable conditions. But you probably need an experienced person to look at her.
Dr. Anthony Back
Dr. Anthony Back
Thank
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology
4 doctors agree
In brief: Thank YOU
I have nothing to add to the other physicians, but i wanted to express my gratitude to you for caring for your mother, her good fortune in having you as caregiver. Remember to tell her that you love her, and keep doing this even if she seems to be unresponsive during waking hours.
Blessings.

In brief: Thank YOU
I have nothing to add to the other physicians, but i wanted to express my gratitude to you for caring for your mother, her good fortune in having you as caregiver. Remember to tell her that you love her, and keep doing this even if she seems to be unresponsive during waking hours.
Blessings.
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Thank
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Radiation Oncology
3 doctors agree
In brief: Your vignette
Doesn't pose a question, but hospice at home is helped by hospice providers that can ease your mom's final hours and help explain what is going on and how to help.
Hospice does not mean a place, and itmeans the best of palliative care delivered by caring experts at yourr side helping you too.

In brief: Your vignette
Doesn't pose a question, but hospice at home is helped by hospice providers that can ease your mom's final hours and help explain what is going on and how to help.
Hospice does not mean a place, and itmeans the best of palliative care delivered by caring experts at yourr side helping you too.
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Thank
Dr. Joseph Woods
Pathology
3 doctors agree
In brief: Let her be/rest.
This is very difficult to determine the best direction to go in.
If she is not in pain, it might be best just to leave her alone. She is going through a lot and probably has a great deal to think about, not to mention the effects of her care. It night be good to talk with her about some of her possible concerns, etc., anything to help put here at ease. Spend as much time as you can with her.

In brief: Let her be/rest.
This is very difficult to determine the best direction to go in.
If she is not in pain, it might be best just to leave her alone. She is going through a lot and probably has a great deal to think about, not to mention the effects of her care. It night be good to talk with her about some of her possible concerns, etc., anything to help put here at ease. Spend as much time as you can with her.
Dr. Joseph Woods
Dr. Joseph Woods
Thank
Dr. Isaac Vielma
Family Medicine
2 doctors agree
In brief: May be expected...
If she is unable to communicate and mumbling/moaning continues, this may be a condition we call terminal agitation.
Depending on the team taking care of her, this can be managed with a medication such as haloperidol or lorazepam. If the team suspects pain (grimacing, furrowed brow & moaning) it's ok to start pain medication as well. If unsure, it's better to assume its pain rather than not.

In brief: May be expected...
If she is unable to communicate and mumbling/moaning continues, this may be a condition we call terminal agitation.
Depending on the team taking care of her, this can be managed with a medication such as haloperidol or lorazepam. If the team suspects pain (grimacing, furrowed brow & moaning) it's ok to start pain medication as well. If unsure, it's better to assume its pain rather than not.
Dr. Isaac Vielma
Dr. Isaac Vielma
Thank
Dr. Dean Giannone
Internal Medicine
In brief: Leave it.
If she seems comfortable, sleeping soundly and free of pain, then she should be left alone.
It may be disturbing to watch but not for her to be experiencing.

In brief: Leave it.
If she seems comfortable, sleeping soundly and free of pain, then she should be left alone.
It may be disturbing to watch but not for her to be experiencing.
Dr. Dean Giannone
Dr. Dean Giannone
Thank
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