How can I tell if my plantar fasciitis is cured?

No heel pain. Plantar fasciitis is an inflammation often a chronic inflammation of the plantar fascia ligament attachment to the heel. If your heel pain is no longer present, your plantar fasciitis is cured but may return without proper stretching and foot support.
Plantar fascitis. You can tell it is cured when you dot have any pain without any meds or splint etc.
Non surgical. Plantar fasciitis can be treated with a triad of night splints, therapy, and heel cups.

Related Questions

Can someone tell me how to cure my plantar fasciitis?

See a podiatrist. Your best/quickest means of treating this is to see a podiatrist (foot and ankle specialist) who in general treats this condition frequently. Many treatment options are available and they should be tailored to you depending on your activity level, types of shoes you wear, foot structure, past treatment, etc. Plantar fasciitis is very treatable, but be patient. Read more...

Is plantar fasciitis a difficult condition to cure?

Can be. Stubborn, best to treat it at the earliest sign of symptoms. Read more...
Maybe. Best managed with stretching your arch and soft supportive orthotics/shoe inserts. Night splints can sometimes be of benefit. Cortisone injections are also popular and effective. There has been recent interest in platelet rich plasma injections. Avoid surgery if possible. Read more...
Not Usually. Plantar fasciitis which is inflammation of the plantar fascia. Tightens at night causing pain in am. Rest, ice, stretching, avoid barefoot, good shoes and arch supports can help. See a podiatrist for further evaluation including a x-ray. The doctor can help with cortisone injections, custom orthotics and other treatment. Read more...
No. Many different modalities can be used to cure it forms therapy to eswt to steroid injections etc to the rice method. See your podiatrist. Read more...
Combo treatment. . If you have plantar fasciitis, the more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes. #2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections, or eswt if available in your area. Very few people go on to surgery, but it is a possibility. Read more...
Protocol... I'd say 98% of my plantar fascitis patients respond to non-surgical treatments... Rest, supportive insoles, rx orthotics, otc anti-inflammatories (like aleve), prescription nsaid's, steroid injections, prp injections, physical therapy, etc... If all else fails... Surgery. Read more...
Plantar fasciitis. If you are diagnosing plantar fasciitis yourself you could be wrong. There are at least 32 different causes for that type of heel pain. See your podiatrist for a more definitive evaluation and treatment. Read more...

How would you recommend I cure my plantar fasciitis?

See podiatrist. On your own: ice heel, wear arch support, night splint, achilles' tendon stretches. Read more...
Custom orthotic. See a board certified podiatrist and have a custom molded functional forefoot orthosis made for you. The process entails taking a nonweightbearing cast of your foot while placing into neutral position. This is the position your foot has deviated from causing your pain. Read more...
Combo treatment. . If you have plantar fasciitis, and hurt most with the first few steps in the morning, the more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes. #2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections, or eswt if available in your area. Read more...

I have had plantar fasciitis for more than a month. How do I cure this?

NEED FOR SUPPORT! Most shoes aren't always what is bad, usually it's the crummy insoles they come with! there are many possibe reasons (plantar fascitis leaps to mind) that you may have pain in the heels, but try arch supports like spenco polysorb (http://www.Spenco.Com/products/footcare/poly-sorb) and otc anti-inflammatories (like aleve). If these don't help, see a podiatrist. Read more...
Combo treatment. . The more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes. #2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor for dosing). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections, or eswt if available in your area. Read more...

Can you please tell me about effective home remedies for plantar fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis. Best managed with stretching your arch and soft supportive orthotics/shoe inserts. Night splints can sometimes be of benefit. Cortisone injections are also popular and effective. There has been recent interest in platelet rich plasma injections. Avoid surgery if possible. Read more...
A few things. Make sure your shoes have good cushion and support and are not excessively worn. If so, replace them. You might want to try over-the-counter arch supports. Doing runners stretches consistently can be a big help. You can also try over-the-counter antiinflammatories. If not improved, see a podiatrist who can offer prescribed medicine, physical therapy, injections, foot orthoses. Surgery is rare. Read more...
Plantar Fasciitis . Plantar fasciitis which is inflammation of the plantar fascia. Tightens at night causing pain in am. Rest, ice, stretching, avoid barefoot, good shoes and over the counter arch supports can help. See a podiatrist for further evaluation including a x-ray. The doctor can help with cortisone injections, custom orthotics and other treatment. Read more...
Home remedies. Plantar fascitis can be very painful. Try the rice method. Rest, ice, compression and elevation. Stretching the foot back toward the shin with a towel or stretch band. Nsaids medication like Ibuprofen might help. If all else failed see your doc. Read more...
Combo treatment. . The more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes. #2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections, or eswt if available in your area. Read more...

How could I tell if I have plantar fasciitis or fibromyalgia?

See specialist. Plantar fasciitis is a biomechanically induced condition affecting arch(plantar fascia) of foot. Fibromyalgia is a painful condition that can affect many areas of body rgardless of biomechanics or weightbearing and even affect sleep patterns. See podiatrist and/or rheumatologist. Read more...
Rule of thumb. In general, plantar fasciitis is localized to the foot/ankle, while fibromyalgia is a more generalized disease affecting multiple muscles and joints around the body. Read more...

Can you tell me what to do for plantar fasciitis pain relief?

Arch supports. Or orthotics, night splint, antiinflammatories, ice the foot, roll foot on a tennis ball or golf ball, Achilles' tendon stretches, if all else fails see foot doc. . Read more...
Get evaluated. See your local Podiatrist for an evaluation. I suggest physical therapy, stretching, icing (10 minutes on/5 off), custom inserts, anti-inflammatory meds. There are also injections which can be done by a Podiatrist which may be effective. Read more...