Dislocated shoulder after treatment; what can I do to make it better sooner?

Time then therapy. The worst complication of shoulde dislocation is recurrent dislocation. This can be prevented with surgery or immobilization after the initial dislocation. An external rotation sling/brace may help the torn labral tissue heal in a better position. It takes about 3 weeks of immobilization before you can start therapy, any sooner and you would be at risk for instability. Patience is important.

Related Questions

What are the typical treatments for a dislocated shoulder?

Depends... The treatment for shoulder dislocations varies based on the reason why the shoulder is dislocating. Some shoulders dislocate because the ligaments that hold the shoulder together are loose. Traumatic dislocations usually result in a ligament tear. The treatment of the loose shoulder may simply be physical therapy, whereas the person with a tear might require surgery. Read more...
Shoulder instability. Depending on age, it would be reasonable to start with rest (in a sling), followed by strengthening exercises outlined by a physical therapist. You will want to avoid extremes of forward flexion and external rotation (hand behind your head) for a period of time. Surgery is needed if you continue to demonstrate instability or pain. Read more...
Surgery. If the patient is young and has recurrent dislocations, generally surgical stabilization is recommended. In the older individual, who rarely dislocates, physical therapy might do the trick. Read more...

What is the cure for a dislocated shoulder?

Reduce, sling, doc. The first thing is to get the shoulder reduced. If it has not been reduced, go to your local emergency room. After reduction, x-rays should be taken to see if any broken bones. They will put you in a sling. At 33Y.O. You can get away with no surgery if your shoulder is stable and there are no other issues like a rotator cuff tear, etc. I would see a shoulder specialist. Read more...
Emergent reduction. This means go to the er and let them put it back in place! Read more...
Physical therapy. If you're a first time dislocator, generally physical therapy is indicated, to strengthen the shoulder musculature, to prevent further dislocations. If you are a recurrent dislocator, you may require surgical stabilization. Read more...