8 doctors weighed in:

What are the changes in the brain from aspergers' syndrome?

8 doctors weighed in
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Pediatrics - Developmental & Behavioral
4 doctors agree

In brief: A variety

Research relating impairment to structure has found a variety of abnormalities that correlate with each other in severity.
Structures, areas & networks of temporal lobes involved in recognizing faces, processing sensory & emotional input, & rapid learning of new info have small, densely -packed neurons with short or disrupted connections the ? Is cause vs. Effect of experience & behavior, or both.

In brief: A variety

Research relating impairment to structure has found a variety of abnormalities that correlate with each other in severity.
Structures, areas & networks of temporal lobes involved in recognizing faces, processing sensory & emotional input, & rapid learning of new info have small, densely -packed neurons with short or disrupted connections the ? Is cause vs. Effect of experience & behavior, or both.
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Thank
2 doctors agree

In brief: No anatomical change

Like many other conditions that psychiatrists treat, asperger's is a clinical diagnosis.
The changes in the brain in asperger's syndrome are not apparent when viewing a ct scan or mri. It may be possible to discern differences in the brain of a patient with asperger's using functional imaging studies (spect or fmri), but these say little more than what we appreciate clinically in these patients.

In brief: No anatomical change

Like many other conditions that psychiatrists treat, asperger's is a clinical diagnosis.
The changes in the brain in asperger's syndrome are not apparent when viewing a ct scan or mri. It may be possible to discern differences in the brain of a patient with asperger's using functional imaging studies (spect or fmri), but these say little more than what we appreciate clinically in these patients.
Dr. Robert Berkowitz
Dr. Robert Berkowitz
Thank
Dr. Glen Elliott
Pediatrics - Psychiatry
2 doctors agree

In brief: Unknown

No specific brain changes (structural or functional) have been identified with either autism or asperger's syndrome.
This may reflect continued limitations of the tools we have or might be at least in part because there are multiple causes, not just one.

In brief: Unknown

No specific brain changes (structural or functional) have been identified with either autism or asperger's syndrome.
This may reflect continued limitations of the tools we have or might be at least in part because there are multiple causes, not just one.
Dr. Glen Elliott
Dr. Glen Elliott
Thank
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