What causes varicose eczema?

Venous hypertension. Varicose or venous eczema is always commonly referred to as stasis dermatitis, even though this is an inaccurate description. Stasis means that blood isn't moving. In the case of venous eczema, the blood is moving, it is just going the wrong way. We call this reflux and reflux occurs in varicose vein disease. The problem is too much pressure in the veins and the inflammation that results.
Stasis Dermatitis? Varicose eczema may be another term used to describe "stasis dermatitis". This is seen on the legs below the knees and results from poor circulation in the legs. The blood in the veins does not circulate well and pools in the legs and can leak out into the skin. This causes irritation and then a rash with itching and sometimes pain. Exercise, support stockings, and topical steroids help.
Varicose rash. Venous eczema is a dermatitis caused by superficial venous insufficiency, and resultant deposition of inflammatory cytokines, metallo- proteases etc into the skin. Vein specialists treat this with saphenous vein ablation and other modalities to reduce ambulatory venous hypertension. Untreated, it may progress to ulceration, pigmentation, scarring, infection and disability.

Related Questions

Is there a miracle cure for varicose eczema?

Eczema. There is no miracle cure for what i think you mean as stasis dermatitis. Topical coticosteroids can give substantial relief. Other helpful preventive measures are weight loss, support hose and leg elevation whenever possible. Read more...
No miracles. Steroid creams can treat the symptoms and appearance of varicose eczema temporarily, and any md can prescribe these. However, if more long term control of the eczema is needed, then the underlying venous disease that is causing the problem should be treated. This is best done by a vein specialist. Read more...

Varicose eczema - can a gp treat?

Stasis dermatitis. A gp can treat what is called stasis dermatitis in the us with prescription strength corticosteroids such as triamcinolone or fluocinonide. Read more...
The symptoms. Steroid creams can treat the symptoms and appearance of varicose eczema temporarily, and any md can prescribe these. However, if more long term control of the eczema is needed, then the underlying venous disease that is causing the problem should be treated. This is best done by a vein specialist. Read more...
Venous ulcer. You have to seen and treated by a vascular surgeon who has a special interest in venous disease. This is essentially a mechanical problem of the venous circulation and will require extensive evaluation and care. Read more...
Varicose eczema. A gp can treat the symptoms with creams, however, really helpful initial treatment that addresses the venous insufficiency, such as gradient compression hosiery, is impractical in cases with weeping dermatitis. Therefore, referral to a vein specialist for definitive diagnosis and treatment is prudent, and can prevent progression to a venous ulcer. Read more...

I have varicose eczema in my right leg. What should I do?

Stasis Dermatitis? Varicose eczema may be another term used to describe "stasis dermatitis". This is seen on the legs below the knees and results from poor circulation in the legs. The blood in the veins does not circulate well and pools in the legs and can leak out into the skin. This causes irritation and then a rash with itching and sometimes pain. Exercise, support stockings, and topical steroids help. Read more...
See a phlebologist. Steroid creams can treat the symptoms and appearance of varicose eczema temporarily, and any md can prescribe these. However, if more long term control of the eczema is needed, then the underlying venous disease that is causing the problem should be treated. This is best done by a vein specialist. Read more...