They found a liver hemangioma on my CT scan. What does this mean?

Common and benign. A liver hemangioma is a benign mass and is one of the most commonly seen liver masses by radiologists. If the suspected hemangioma does not have a typical appearance, a liver MRI may be ordered. Sometimes, these hemangiomas are followed up with additional ct scan and/or MRI in a 3-6 months to assess their stability.
Usually asymptomatic. Liver hemangiomas are disorganized collections of blood vessels within the liver. They usually do not cause symptoms unless they get really large. They don't really have an appreciable risk of converting into cancer. Typically they are just observed unless they are massive or symptomatic. If it meets classic criteria for a hemangioma, you don't even really need to get repeat scans.

Related Questions

Can you get a liver hemangioma diagnosis by CT scan?

Yes. Hemangiomas of the liver can be diagnosed with ct, mri, and ultrasound. Read more...
Yes. Yes - if IV contrast (dye is used). Mri is also very good at correctly identifying hemangiomas. Read more...

Had clear ab CT scan. 6 weeks later had ab u/s w/ probable liver hemangioma dx. Why wld it not have been seen on CT scan?

Technique. It would depend on the way the ct was performed. With IV contrast or without. Timing delay etc. So it is possible the hemangioma may not have been see. Read more...

Diffuse urq pain at times lower & n back. U/s diagnosis "probable liver hemangioma". How confident can I be in that w/ "probable" & why wasn't it on CT scan?

Confident. Hemangiomas have a typical ultrasound appearance including round shape, bright (hyperechoic), and increased transmission of signal deep to the lesion; a confident diagnosis can be made in most cases. However, if you have any underlying liver disease such as cirrhosis then a ct would be needed for more specific evaluation. Read more...

Clear ab CT scan w/ IV & oral contrast, clear colonoscopy then u/s diagnosis liver hemangioma. Urq pain & tender spot n lower right rear rib. Ideas & nxt step?

See HPB surgeon. The symptoms you describe could well be related to the hepatic hemangioma. The decision to remove will depend on: 1) size (usually remove when > 10 cm); 2) symptomatic (pain, ache, fullness); 3) causing blood problems (when the hemangioma destroys blood cells); 4) causes congestive heart failure. See a surgeon who specializes in liver surgery, a hepatobiliary surgeon. Read more...

Ultrasound revealed liver hemangioma. Doc wants an MRI but I'm claustrophobic. CT scan with no contrast agent sufficient for proper diagnosis?

If CT..Need contrast. Both MRI and CT can be excellent ways of confirming that a liver tumor or nodule is in fact a Hemangioma as there are very defining characteristics about these lesions by both these methods of imaging. Liver Hemangiomas have a very characteristic enhancement pattern using contrast, where the periphery enhances first and then the center fills over time. With CT contrast is needed to observe this. Read more...
MRI better. In this context, MRI is the better test. Perhaps you can have an open MRI (unless MRA is needed). Or wide bore MRI (not as tight as the usual MRI). Or MRI with sedation or even under anesthesia. . Read more...