What is the risk of retinal detachment after pvd?

10-15% The risk of retinal break, tear, or detachment after posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) is thought to be around 10-15%. This is why patients should have a dilated fundus examination if they experience new onset flashes, floaters, or change in vision.
Very Low. A PVD occurs when the vitreous gel liquefies and collapses. This occurs with aging and happens earlier in patients with severe nearsightedness. Very rarely, a retinal tear and develop during this process, which leads to a retinal detachment. It is common to be followed by an ophthalmologist after developing a PVD to make sure the retina is healthy.

Related Questions

How often does pvd result in retinal detachment?

Not sure of the. Percentages. I think of retinal detachment more associated with myopia. But ask your phthalmologist. They have to a special exam to look carefully at your retina by the way. Read more...
Very rarely. A PVD occurs when the vitreous gel liquefies and collapses. This occurs with aging and happens earlier in patients with severe nearsightedness. Very rarely, a retinal tear and develop during this process, which leads to a retinal detachment. It is common to be followed by an ophthalmologist after developing a PVD to make sure the retina is healthy. Read more...

Does all retinal traction lead to retinal detachment at some point in time in future, what is the avg percentage? How do we know that pvd is complete?

No. Not all traction leads to rd. It depends on many, many factors so i couldn't give you a percentage. Only less than 10% of pvds result in rd. Read more...
No, not always. The development of retinal detachment depends upon the type of traction and what is being pulled. The common form (pvd as you mention) is the vitreous degenerating as you age. The majority of pvds do not lead to retinal detachment, but need to be followed for the development of retinal tears. Flashes, new floaters, etc. Should be check by a retina person immediately. Read more...

Retinal detachment/ is this a possibility if old tear and evolving pvd in that eye?

Of course. It can tear further. If you have any change in vision and even if you dont see an eye doctor yearly. Read more...
Absolutely. Yes. . Although more likely with a recent or fresh tear, a retinal detachment can occur with any tear, particularly in the process of developing a PVD or posterior vitreous detachment. The PVD is a consequence of vitreous separation and liquefaction. In is a natural process. A laser treatment will substantially reduce the risk of a detachment. If the old tear is pigmented well, then no laser needed. Read more...

I've had 3 retinal detachment surgeries in the past year and regularly use cannabis. Could cannabis use and its IOP lowering effects also cause PVD?

Not from cannabis. The posterior vitreous detachment would be related to the retinal detachment surgery in the same eye. If the PVD is in the other eye it may be related to myopia. High myopia is associated with retinal detachment and PVD. I stongly suggest you be examined by your ophthalmologist to rule out a PVD related retinal tear. None of this is related to cannabis use. Read more...

In high young myopes, is there a chance of retinal detachment long after pvd is over? Do we have to live with floaters/flashes with the fear of rd

Unfortunately yes. If you make it through your PVD without an rd, your risk becomes less. The flashes stop when PVD is completed. You may still have lattice retinal degeneration and corresponding risk of rd. Trauma and other causes initiate rd more often in high myopes. You can have preventative laser done to protect you from an rd stealing your vision. Read more...
No simple answer. High myopes always have a higher risk of retinal detachment (rd) than non-myopes. The risk is greatest while there are acute PVD symptoms (flashes, new floaters). Once the acute symptoms subside, the floaters are a nuisance that gets worse slowly, and the retinal detachment risk decreases sharply, but does not go away completely. Chronic floaters correlate poorly with rd risk. Read more...

How often should I have my eye checked as I'm diagnosed with incomplete PVD in my right eye today? Already had retinal detachment surgery in left eye.

On symptoms. If you had re-attachment surgery in the left eye, the retinal surgeon should have checked the right eye for risk. You have PVD in this eye and I am guessing the same retinal specialist made this diagnosis and found no detachment or risks. Given your young age, you probably should be checked every six months for a while but be alert for symptoms like light flashing and multiple floaters. Read more...
If symptomatic . . . Vitreous detachment happens to all of us, eventually. The great majority of the time it does not cause problems. In the very small majority of patients it can cause a retinal tear or detachment. If you are experiencing symptoms such as flashing light or new floaters, you should see an eye doctor as soon as possible. If the vitreous detachment is "fresh" your doctor will determine how often. Read more...