How bad a child's asthma need to be to prescribe Pulmicort respules?

Depends. In general inhaled steroids are started when a child is experiencing frequent night cough (> 2/mo), frequent asthma symptoms/inhaler use (>2/wk), limited activities, frequent severe attacks (<6wks apart). You can also use steroid inhalers instead of Pulmicort or use singulair (montelukast) pills/granules instead of a steroid. The age of the child also plays a role. It's different for a 2mo old vs 14 yr old.
Frequency/severity. If a child needs to use a rescue inhaler (or nebulizer) more than two days a week on a regular basis, or asthma symptoms are waking her up more than twice a week, the asthma is not in good control. An inhaled steroid (such as pulmicort) may be indicated to reduce swelling in the bronchial tubes.

Related Questions

How bad does your child's asthma need to be to have Pulmicort respules prescribed?

Mild persistent. If a person with asthma uses their albuterol to treat symptoms more than twice per week or has night-time asthma more than twice per month, then their asthma is poorly controlled and they need a controller medication. Albuterol is a "rescue" medication and only temporarily reverses symptoms without treating the underlying problem. Pulmicort is a controller medication. Read more...
MIld or moderate. If they need their inhaler more than two times a week, have nocturnal symptoms, persistant cough, etc they may need an inhaled steroid. Read more...

How bad does a child's asthma need to be in order to have Pulmicort respules used?

Routine for toddlers. I commonly use Budesonide respules with bronchospasm in infants as young as 6m or so.I use it as a preventative agent in infants & toddlers & switch to hand held inhalers by 4-6 depending on the skills of the kid.If a kid needs nebulized bronchodilators in this age range, they can use the budesonide. It is much less total steroid burden on the child's g&d & immune system than pulsed oral steroids. Read more...
Asthma. Severity os a significant component. But if you have to ask the question, then you really should see an asthma specialist to make that decision for you. Better to treat and be safe, then pay the price (expense and worry) of a late night visit to the urgent care. Read more...