Related Questions

I have lupus anticoagulant antibodies. Do I need to worry if I am on coumadin (warfarin)?

Coumadin (warfarin) works well! The cascade of potential thrombosis mechanisms usually caused by acla -f the IgG or IgM class, is virtually blunted the coumadin (warfarin). So little to worry about, providing someone is checking your protime and inr, to make sure you are in therapeutic range. Heparin and it's newer analogues may work better, but require injection. Read more...
Little worry. Actually being on Coumadin (warfarin) if you have lupus anticoagulant is a very good idea if you have had a blood clot. Read more...

I have aps. My doc says I would have to be off Coumadin (warfarin) for several weeks to be tested for lupus anti-coagulant antibody. How do I know if I have it?

Do as your doc says. Antiphospholipid syndrome is a complicated hematological entity that is diagnosed with laboratory testing. You will know that you have it (or don't have it) when your doctor tells you the results of the testing. Meanwhile, you should do as he/she says. Read more...
Would not effect ABS. Being on Coumadin (warfarin) does not have an effect on antibody titers. It simply protects against clotting, a major complication of aps. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: lupus anticoagulant antibodies?

See below. Lupus anticoagulant (la) is an immunoglobulin that binds to phospholipids and proteins associated with the cell membrane. The disease name is a misnomer. La is actually a prothrombotic agent. The presence of la antibodies precipitates the formation of thrombi. The name derives from their properties in vitro, since in lab tests la causes an increase in clotting time. Read more...
Lupus anticoagualant. Is a tricky area. Patients with autoimmune diseases including lupus can present with a prolonged partial thromboplastin time (PTT) which would usually indicate an anticoagulant effect and risk for bleeding. Paradoxically, such individuals are at increased risk of clotting. Read more...
Risk factor for clot. These are antibodies that affect how blood clots, increasing risk of thrombi, pulmonary emboli, unsuccessful pregnancies and a series of other body system damage. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: lupus anticoagulant antibodies present?

Depends. The lupus anticoagulant (la) is a screening test for anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome. (apas). Apas includes sometimes severe blood clotting of the arteries and veins. Women with apas sometimes have multiple miscarriages. Some but not all apas patients have lupus (sle). There are false positive la tests: infection and if the test is taken when patient is on an anti-coagulant such as heparin. Read more...
Lupus anticoagulants. Lupus anticoagulant is one of the tests used to diagnose a condition called anti phospholipid syndrome, a coagulopathy that increases the risk of venous thrombotic and arterial events. The presence of the lupus anticoagulant by itself is not diagnostic of aps. It should be taken in the context of clinical signs and symptoms and repeated at least twice (in addition to other test) within 12 weeks. Read more...

I am on warfarin due to aps or antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. My lupus caused aps. Can I take phentermine?

See a neurologist. I wish there was an easy yes/no answer to this. APS makes you prone to clots and catastrophic APS can cause multi-organ failure. Unfortunately phentermine is a stimulant that can cause blood vessel narrowing. I would make this decision in conjunction with an endocrinologist and neurologist. Read more...

Is aps possible if beta-2 glycoprotein, lupus anticoagulant and cardiolipin-ig- (g/m/a)are >0.2. Is test to be repeated in 1-2yrs if once negative?

No. It is highly unlikely that you have apa syndrome if the tests are negative. The test values can vary from time to time and may even be negative on rare occasions. However, if you have symptoms and the tests are negative at that time then you need to find another cause. Read more...

In 11/2014 I was hospitalized with bilateral PE. 3 lupus anticoagulant tests have come back positive, and he said it's primary. Does that mean APS?

Almost... In my experience it can be primary, but other autoimmune disease must be excluded. IgM, followed by IgG anti -cardiolipin antibodies are the most problematic! This is important, since apart from anticoagulants, other drugs may be needed. Read more...

How risky is attempting pregnancy at the age of 40, mild lupus, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome currently taking coumadin (warfarin)?

Risks are low! I do not see major risks in becoming pregnant, that is if you get pregnant. You will be switched to heparin, probably once daily lovenox (enoxaparin). But your lupus can be managed successfully during pregnancy, and the hughes syndrome should be a non-issue if on an anticoagulant. Hope you achieve your goal! Read more...
Risks. The risks as you describe them, are many, but they are not insurmountable. First, having a baby at 40 is more of a health hazard than having a baby at 20. This might be the biggest hurdle. Second, any chronic disease must be well controlled. Lupus should be quiet before attempting pregnancy. Third, any medications should be reviewed - you are likely aware that warfarin causes birth defects. Read more...