Which postoperative treatments do you recommend for people with colon cancer?

Stage dependent. Postoperative therapy is stage dependent. For stage 1 cancer usually just follow-up is enough; for high-risk stage 2 cases chemotherapy or clinical trials are considered; for all stage 3 and 4 cases chemotherapy is recommended; radiation is usually not required unless tumor was attached to other structures or couldn't be entirely removed for example.
Depends on Stage. The stage of colon cancer is dependent on the depth of the cancer in the colon wall as well as the presence of cancer in adjacent lymph nodes, organs, or distant sites. Depending on the stage, chemotherapy +/- radiation therapy may be indicated.

Related Questions

What is the best treatment for colon cancer?

Surgery+/-ChemoRx. The cornerstone of therapy is surgical resection of the part of the colon. The stage of the cancer is dependent upon the surgical findings (depth of cancer, lymph node evaluation), which will guide the decision regarding chemotherapy. Very rarely, radiation therapy will be recommended for more advanced colon cancers. Read more...
It is case by case. The treatment for colon cancer will depend on many factors. The most important ones are the stage of the disease and performance status of the patient / and other comorbidities. There are 3 treatment modalities to treat cancer- surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Whether the patient needs to get surgery plus minus chemotherapy or if radiation is needed-all will depend on the above factors. Read more...
Prevention is better. Colon cancer is preventable. Colonoscopy screening based on accepted national guidelines (age 45 for select populations, age 50 for most other americans) is the gold standard. While not perfect, colonoscopy detects and removes many pre-cancerous polyps prior to cancer development. Key preventatives also include: mediterranean high fiber, low fat diets, proper weight, baby aspirin, avoid tobacco. Read more...

What are some alternate colon cancer treatments?

Complementary. If you have colorectal cancer, you are going to need surgery if you hope for a cure. Radiation and chemotherapy may be appropriate. If you opt to forego evidence-based treatment in favor of some slick promotion, you will die miserably of your cancer and hating the people who suckered you. By contrast, complementary (mental, physical, spiritual) treatments are very much worth learning about now. Read more...

What kinds of treatment are available for colon cancer?

Several. After diagnosis, the primary treatment is surgery, with adjuvant chemotherapy if indicated. For rectal cancers, neoadjuvant therapy with chemo and radiation followed by surgery if necessary is the standard of care for most patients. Read more...
Many. Colon cancer is so common that many medical trials have been performed which help doctors know better how to treat this disease. Depending upon the patient and stage of cancer, surgery, radiation, and various chemotherapies may be of benefit. You oncology team who know your specific situation can give more specific recommendations. Read more...

Diagnosed colon cancer today. What are the treatments for.

It depends. On the stage of colon cancer. Early stage is usually treated with surgery alone or followed by adjuvant chemotherapy if justified based on certain tumor features. Metastatic disease is usually treated with chemotherapy with or without surgery based on clinical presentation and extent of metastasis. An oncologist can help you in determining the next treatment modality. Read more...
Colon cancer. The mainstay for colon cancer is complete surgical resection of the colon with negative margins and the draining lymph node basin. Treatment from there depends on your pathology. However, if the colon cancer has spread, chemotherapy may be the direction of treatment. Read more...

Why are treatments for colon cancer performed every other week?

Prevent toxicity. Following surgery of a colon cancer malignancy, if lesion had spread to regional nodes or further, adjuvant chemotherapy is given to prevent recurrence or handle an unresectable metastatic process. Drug combinations such as FOLFOX are used but do produce toxicity such as marked lowering of blood count. To allow stabilization of red and white cells a break in delivery such as q2 wks are employed. Read more...

What kind of pills or treatment can somebody get for colon cancer?

Many options. Colon cancer is best treated in a multidisciplinary fashion according to location and stage at diagnosis. Most treatments are iv, but several oral agents are used as part of treatment regimens including Capecitabine (xeloda), and some targeted agents in trials. Treatment in early stages or selected patients with stage IV disease also involves surgery and may involve radiation. Read more...
Stage is important. Depend on the stage. In early stage ( st age i-3 ) - curative surgery is the treatment. Chemotherapy ( 5-FU based chemo) would be needed after surgery in all stage 3 and certain cases of stage 2 disease. In stage 4- chemo/biological therapy is the treatment. Surgery sometimes is also done in certain case of stage 4 i.e. Obstruction/bleeding. Xeloda (capecitabine) is a pro drug of 5-FU and it is pill. Read more...

What is colon cancer and what are the different kinds of treatments?

Is a malignancy. Colon cancer is the third leading cause of death from cancer in the US, in men and women. Screening starts at the age of 40 years with stool samples for blood, and yearly rectal examination. Baseline colonoscopy starts at the age of 50. Treatment depends at the time of diagnosis. Usually involves surgery, chemotherapy and radiation for rectal cancers. Read more...

What are the treatment options for colon cancer. Is it fully treated. Thanks?

May be. Multiple treatment options depending on what stage of cance at the time of dx, if stage1/2 can be surgically removed and thus fully treated. per higher stage means more spreading of cancer and at that point its more palliative and suppressing the growth of cancer cells not curing it. Read more...
Depends. This depends on so many things, where it is, how invasive, what type of cancer, metastasis, patient health, etc. I do not mean to make light of it any way and I hope you are not dealing with it. While some may have successful treatments, it is very hard to say on any prognostic factors without a lot of detail in this specific circumstance. I know this does not clarify much, but hope it helps. Read more...