5 doctors weighed in:

What is the most recommended colon cancer screening test?

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Faye Vargas Morris
Internal Medicine
2 doctors agree

In brief: Colon cancer screens

The most recommended colon cancer screening test is the colonoscopy, starting at the age of 50 (if there is no family history of colon cancer).
A colonoscopy views the inside of the colon (large intestine) and rectum, using a tool called a colonoscope. The colonoscope has a small camera attached to a flexible tube that can reach the length of the colon.

In brief: Colon cancer screens

The most recommended colon cancer screening test is the colonoscopy, starting at the age of 50 (if there is no family history of colon cancer).
A colonoscopy views the inside of the colon (large intestine) and rectum, using a tool called a colonoscope. The colonoscope has a small camera attached to a flexible tube that can reach the length of the colon.
Dr. Faye Vargas Morris
Dr. Faye Vargas Morris
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1 comment
Dr. Faye Vargas Morris
http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/uspscolo.htm
Dr. Sean O Donovan
Surgery - Colorectal
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Colonoscopy

Colonoscopy and stool tests for blood are the most popular, but barium enema and ct scans are also useful though less frequently used.
Each has advantages and disadvantages, but the 'gold standard' remains colonoscopy.

In brief: Colonoscopy

Colonoscopy and stool tests for blood are the most popular, but barium enema and ct scans are also useful though less frequently used.
Each has advantages and disadvantages, but the 'gold standard' remains colonoscopy.
Dr. Sean O Donovan
Dr. Sean O Donovan
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Dr. Howard Hack
Internal Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Colonoscopy

Colonoscopies are the mainstay for colon cancer screening.
These should start at 50 for average risk people. The subsequent exams are 10 years apart with no polyps and no other colon cancer risk factors.

In brief: Colonoscopy

Colonoscopies are the mainstay for colon cancer screening.
These should start at 50 for average risk people. The subsequent exams are 10 years apart with no polyps and no other colon cancer risk factors.
Dr. Howard Hack
Dr. Howard Hack
Thank
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