What diet should I follow to prevent colorectal cancer from occurring?

Colon CA & Diet. Colon cancer has been associated with diets high in animal fat, red meats, and processed meats containing nitrites. Eating a well balanced diet that minimizes these foods, and contains leafy, green vegetables, and foods high in antioxidants, minerals, and vitamins, is recommended to decrease the risk. Dietary fiber is also recommended to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer.
Eat your veggies. Population studies show groups that eat high fiber, grains, fruit, veggies, legumes have lower rates. Calcium foods (no/low fat dairy), may help. Low intake meat, especially processed meats may help. Fiber supplements are less helpful than fiber foods. Low (sat) fat, high fiber may be a good combo. Dash diet (dietary approach to stop hypertension): easy, tasty, healthy. Find it online.

Related Questions

Is there any way to help prevent the return of my colorectal cancer?

4-Tiered Strategy. Surveillance: at the advice of your gastroenterologist, schedule routine colonoscopies; healthy habits: follow a diet high in veggies, fruits, and whole-grains, try to limit red meat and alcohol, exercise regularly; chemoprevention: talk to your oncologist about taking folate (folic acid) supplements and/or nsaids; genetic testing: if you have many relatives with colon ca, you may be a candidate for testing. Read more...

How does reducing colonic transit time with fiber prevent colorectal cancer?

It doesnt. That was antheory espoused several years ago based on population based studies but it never panned out. Read more...
Inflammation! Although the data supports a healthy diet high in fiber with fruits and vegetables improves colonic health - there is some speculation that it may also reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. A diet high in dietary fiber reduces colonic transit time - meaning you go more regularly. The more regular you move your bowels there is less stagnation of stool and decreased inflammation in the colon. Read more...
Less contact. The hypothesis is that one factor in colon cancer is potentially ingested carcinogens(cancer causing) that are in the food we eat. The faster the stool moves through the colon, the less time the carcinogen has in contact with any segment of the colon so it's should be less damaging. Read more...

Is my diet involved in colorectal cancer development?

It May Be. Studies have shown that diets with a high intake of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains are associated with a lower risk of colon cancer. In contrast, high red-meat diets are associated with an increased risk. Read more...
Colorectal CA/diet. Many investigators believe that certain diets high in animal fat, red meat, and nitrites from processed meats, are associated with an increased risk of colon cancer. Leafy green vegetables and foods rich in antioxidants, minerals, and vitamins counter this effect. There are some studies that purport to show that Aspirin can decrease the risk also. A well-balanced diet is the best choice. Read more...

How the high fat diet and low fiber diet considered as a risk factor of colorectal cancer?

Controversial. Various studies have yielded various results, as is common in epidemiology. It may still be "politically correct" to blame meat-eating, low-fiber, high-fat diets for colon cancer, but you also need to know that the hard-core studies have generally shown less of an effect than you may have been told. Don't forego screening -- no one's immune. Read more...

My son has colorectal cancer. Where do I start?

Colon ca. Sorry to hear that. The most important now is to find the stage of disease as treatment will depend on the stage of the cancer and also the type. See your doctor and have a detail discussion on this. For more info- www.Nccn.Com , re- patient resource. Consider genetic evaluation if age is 40 or younger and/or if strong family history of cancer to rule out hereditary syndrome -i.e. Fap/hnpcc etc. Read more...
Surgical oncologist. Go to a surgeon who treats a lot of colorectal cancer - a surgical oncologist, colorectal surgeon, or an experienced general surgeon. Surgery is almost always a major part of the treatment process, but he will need tests (colonoscopy if not already done), ct scan, cea. The surgeon is the best expert to be the "captain of the ship". He/she can explain and consult with other oncologists if needed. Read more...
Colorectal surgeon. I advise having him seen by a colorectal surgeon, who is a specialist in diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancers. He or she will also take a family history to assess the risk of other family members. Most colorectal cancers are curable when diagnosed early; most do not require a permanent colostomy. Good luck to you and your son. Read more...

How many people get colorectal cancer after 65?

Enough/a great many. The incidence of this cancer goes up greatly after age 50. This is why colonoscopy is recommended for anyone over age 50 as a guideline. Both men and women are affectedust about equally. Colonoscopy is recommended by the american cancer society “guidelines for the early detection of cancer” once every 10 years and flexible sigmoidoscopy, barium enema, and virtual colonoscopy every 5 years. Read more...