7 doctors weighed in:

Does lumbar spinal stenosis require surgery?

7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Patrick Connolly
Neurosurgery
3 doctors agree

In brief: Depends

If the symptoms aren't bad then i generally do not recommend surgery.
If someone can't walk a block and has failed physical therapy and epidural steroids, surgery can be helpful.

In brief: Depends

If the symptoms aren't bad then i generally do not recommend surgery.
If someone can't walk a block and has failed physical therapy and epidural steroids, surgery can be helpful.
Dr. Patrick Connolly
Dr. Patrick Connolly
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Dr. Loren Lewis
Occupational Medicine
2 doctors agree

In brief: Not always

Usually, unless there is a need for urgent surgical intervention, a trial of conservative therapy is attempted.
This may consist of combinations of physical therapy, medication, and epidural injections, most commonly, there is no urgent or emergent issue and surgery is performed for symptom relief and to improve function rather than for alleviating an emergent structural problem.

In brief: Not always

Usually, unless there is a need for urgent surgical intervention, a trial of conservative therapy is attempted.
This may consist of combinations of physical therapy, medication, and epidural injections, most commonly, there is no urgent or emergent issue and surgery is performed for symptom relief and to improve function rather than for alleviating an emergent structural problem.
Dr. Loren Lewis
Dr. Loren Lewis
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Dr. Kevin Vaught
Neurosurgery

In brief: No

Surgery for spinal stenosis is only needed in symptomatic patients that have failed all conservative measures.
Check out spine-health.Com.

In brief: No

Surgery for spinal stenosis is only needed in symptomatic patients that have failed all conservative measures.
Check out spine-health.Com.
Dr. Kevin Vaught
Dr. Kevin Vaught
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Dr. Thomas Dowling
Orthopedic Surgery - Spine

In brief: Not usually

Most times, it is managed nonoperatively.
This includes activity modification, medication, exercise/physical therapy, a 0 degree lordosis back brace, epidural steroid injections, use of a cane or walker. 15% with stenosis actually improve over time. For those who find there symptoms limiting them and having filed nonop care, then surgery is an option based on their medical condition.

In brief: Not usually

Most times, it is managed nonoperatively.
This includes activity modification, medication, exercise/physical therapy, a 0 degree lordosis back brace, epidural steroid injections, use of a cane or walker. 15% with stenosis actually improve over time. For those who find there symptoms limiting them and having filed nonop care, then surgery is an option based on their medical condition.
Dr. Thomas Dowling
Dr. Thomas Dowling
Thank
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