What is the difference between lumbar radiculopathy and lumbosacral spondylosis?

See below. Spondylosis refers the development or degenerative changes in the spine, whereas radiculopathy infers the irritation of a nerve in the back. Spondylosis can lead to a radiculopathy, but there are also other causes of a radiculopathy other than Spondylosis as well.
Nerve v degeneration. Lumbar radiculopathy a pain pattern due to nerve compression and spondylosus a term meaning degeneration of spine which can sometimes lead to a lumbar radiculopathy.

Related Questions

Can lumbar radiculopathy present seperately from spondylosis, or is spondylosis the culprit? My doctor states I lumbar radiculopathy but MRI shows dd

Lumbar radiculopathy. Lumbar radiculopathy is commonly pain radiating from low back to legs. Caused by a pinch nerve in low back spondylosis as well as disc disease is putting pressure on nerve causing you to have pain. Read more...
Spondylosis. Radiculopathy in the lumbar spine implies irritation of a nerve that causes leg pain with or without back pain. Spondylosis is a very general term describing various forms of arthritis in the spine (degeneration of the joints). It should not be confused with spondylolysis which is a malformation in the bones (pars defect) that causes instability. Read more...

What is the difference between 'herniated disk' and 'lumbar radiculopathy'?

Different labels. A disc herniation is a portion of a disc outside its normal confines while a radiculopathy is pain over a nerve path cuaaed by a pinching or compression of that nerve which could include a disc herniation, a cyst, a tumor or mass, a blood clot called a hematoma or spobal strnosis to name a few. Read more...

Lumbar radiculopathy: dr says I don't have disk problems, I've not had an injury to my back, so what else could cause that? Is it permenant?

Multiple causes. Degenerative disc disease can cause symptoms. Mri could reveal pinched nerves if pain and weakness become severe. If steroids are used for asthma could have osteoporosis and compression fractures. Lab work could determine inflammatory causes. Emg could define type of nerve involvement. Recent birth could result in si joint or pubic pain. Conservative therapy with nsaids, rest or epidurals help. Read more...
See spine specialist. Must have an MRI to determine disk health. Other causes of pain down the leg: 1) piriformis syndrome with sciatica 2) lumbar facet joints (referred pain) 3) sacroiliac joint (referred) 4) myofascial trigger points 5) spinal stenosis with neurogenic claudication 6) vascular claudication may need emg/ncs. Read more...
Sciatica. Pain in the distribution as you suggested describes the pattern of the nerve that travels in the leg called the sciatic nerve. The sciatic nerve is not the cause of the pain source, it is the result of an irritated nerve typically in the lumbar spine (low back) which are caused by herniated disks, spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease requiring further evaluation by a spine specialist. Read more...

Male 31yrs. Getting sharp headaches lasting 1-2 seconds since about 10 days. History: lumbar radiculopathy last year-brought under control by therapy?

Ice Pick headaches. Variant of Migraine headaces , could also be related to cluster headaches. The cause is unkonown. See your doctor . Antiinflammatory drugs helps. A shot of Toradol and Decadron (dexamethasone) has been used to get fast response to pain. Read more...
Paroxysms of pain. I would need more info to be of help- Where does the pain start on your head and does it radiate? What is the quality of the pain (i,e, sharp, pounding like you pulse, squeezing...)? What is the severity (0-10)? Does it change with exertion? What are the associated symptoms if any? What is the response to any therapeutic measures? Read more...

My neurosurgeon diagnosed and stated I am disabled from cervical and lumbar radiculopathy. He said there is nothing surgical to fix the problems, and?

Second Opinion. Surgical recommendations can vary from surgeon to surgeon, based upon experience, training, and proficiency. I would suggest at least getting a second opinion from a surgeon who has done additional fellowship training in spinal disorders before surgery is ruled out. You may also want to look into a multidisciplinary pain management program. Read more...

I've got a lumbar radiculopathy and I'm wondering if this pain is for my lifetime or if it is treated the pain will go away permanently?

Probably not. That's just impossible to say. It depends heavily on what's causing the pinched nerve. Is it just a bulged/herniated disc? Is there some joint arthritis with spurs pinching the nerve? What about a synovial cyst? How big is the herniation if there is one? Epidural steroid injections can help tremendously for acute (new) radiculopathy, but will likely eventually need to be repeated. Read more...
Will Improve. Without treatment it may be around for awhile. Naturally the radiculopathy pain improves by 3-6 weeks on its own. However if it persists after that you may choose to get care, otherwise discs typically heal over 6-9 months, Read more...
Varies. It varies based upon the cause, but most cases of radiculopathy are very treatable and so it typically does not have to be a permanent condition. Read more...