Is stage 4 colorectal cancer curable?

Majority will be No. When the cancer has spread to other organ beyond the primary organ-metastatic disease- or stage 4- , majority , it is an incurable disease. In a very selected case, when the metastatic disease is very limited - 1 or 2- only in the liver or only in the lung- and no other disease anywhere else and if surgery can be done to remove completely, attemp to cure the cancer can be done with chemo & surgery.
Yes. If the liver and/or lung metastasis are resectable. For example in only 1 lung, and/or only lobe in the liver. A comprehensive cancer center is better prepare and experienced to handle this cases (i.E, md anderson in houston, sloan kittering in ny, james cancer center in at ohio state, stansford cancer institute).
Stage IV CRC. Colorectal cancer must be expertly staged. If so, the prognosis for stage IV crc is unfortunately very poor. That is, the 5-year survival is less than ten percent. So a very few people are 'cured'... If this is you or someone close to you I am sorry to read this. Please get the best possible advice from an oncologist.

Related Questions

My dad is 56. Diagnosed 12/7/16 with Stage 4 colorectal cancer, liver metastases and perforated colon. What's his prognosis if he starts chemo 1/11/17?

Fair. Metastatic colon Ca treatable if primary lesion resected. What is in liver remains in liver to be treated by microwave ablation or chemoembolization. Question about perforation which releases cells into peritoneal cavity that can be treated by hyperthermic perfusion and systemic chemo. Immunotherapy with mAb targeting mutated MUC5ac coming into play. Read more...

58 Years old diagnosed with Stage IV colorectal cancer and spread to liver with 7+cm tumor and lesions in the lung. What kind of life expectancy?

It Depends. Recent progress in genetic typing of individual Colon Ca tumors and genetic specific tumor drugs is leading to better understanding of likelihood of treatment success. See: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Arun_Azad/publication/246837094_Predicting_the_response_to_targeted_therapy_in_metastatic_colorectal_cancer/links/5419c4180cf2218008bf9f8a.pdf I recommend getting into a clinical trial. Read more...

My mother was told she has stage 4 colorectal cancer. The oncologyst said there is nothing they can do for her, no medication, no treatment, she must?

Glad they're honest. I'm sorry about your mom. I'm glad you got to be part of one anothers' lives, and that you care for her during her time of sickness. While the cancer may not be treatable, there are comfort and palliative measures, and this is a time to wrap up life, perhaps accomplish a few personal goals still possible, and seek comfort and dignity. Best wishes. Read more...

How fast does colorectal cancer grow?

Depends. Growth rate can depend on several factors. Here is a good review on colorectal cancer http://www.Cancer.Net/cancer-types/colorectal-cancer. Read more...

Can young person get colorectal cancer?

Yes, but uncommon. About 150000 new cases of colon/rectal ca in us/yr. 90% are age 50 and up. + family history, especially of early ca increases risk. Longstanding ibd increases risk. Certain (rare to uncommon) genetic syndromes increase risk. Check your family's history, see your doc. Read more...
Yes. Colon cancer can strike at young ages, especially if there are hereditary colon diseases in the family such as familial adenomatous polyposis or lynch syndromes. In the absence of these syndromes, risk generally increases with age. However, even with no colorectal cancer in the family it can strike at young ages although this is more rare (my youngest patient was 23 at diagnosis). Read more...
Colon cancer. Colon cancer is rare before age 40 and usually associated with some family history if you do see it. Most colon cancer occurs after age 50. Thus screening for people without a family history starts at 50 and screening starts at 40 in those with a family histiory. Read more...
Yes, but rare. . The short answer is "yes", a young person can get colorectal cancer. However, this and the associated familial syndromes that cause colorectal cancer in young individuals are rare. Having first- or second-degree relatives with a cancer diagnosis at a young age should prompt you to get early screening. Read more...

What are common symptoms of colorectal cancer?

Blockage, Bleeding. The most common symptoms associated with colon cancer include (cramping) abdominal pain, a change in bowel habits ("pencil-thin stools"), bloody bowel movements, weakness/fatigue, and/or weight loss. The goal, of course, is to diagnose colon cancers before symptoms develop; i advise colonoscopy at age 50, or earlier if there is a family history. Read more...
Blood in stool. Common symptoms of colorectal cancer include blood in the stool, narrowing of the calibre of stools (pencil-thin stools), abdominal cramping or bloating and weight loss. Unfortunately, by the time colon cancer causes symptoms it is often advanced which is why it's so important to get screening colonoscopy starting at age 50' or younger for higher risk patients. Read more...
Colon cancer sxs. Change in bowel habits, blood in the stool, abdominal bloating, weight loss, anemia to name the most comman. Read more...
They vary widely . Probably the most common symptom is no symptom at all. However, some people may present with anemia, bleeding in the stool, all the way to an obstructing colon mass. The symptoms vary widely, but the take-home message is to get the appropriate cancer screening. For most, this is a screening colonoscopy at age 50. Read more...

Is the death rate from colorectal cancer rising?

No. Death rate from colon cancer is declining in the usa. For details consult: http://www.Cancer.Gov/ncicancerbulletin/071211/page2. Read more...