What are the risks of surgery for dupuytren's contracture and what is the alternative?

Pain and recurrence. Surgery for dupuytren's contracture will usually straighten the affected fingers, but is not without risk. Infection or other wound healing problems may occur. Temporary or permanent nerve damage is also seen. Pain and scarring can prevent motion. All treatments of dupuytren's contracture have a risk of recurrence. Alternatives to surgery include Collagenase injections and needle aponuerotomy.
Lots when done open. Most common complications include nerve injury, tendon injury, arterial injury, recurrence, stiffness, infection & hematoma. Consider minimally invasive needle aponeurotomy or xiaflex (collagenase clostridium histolyticum) injection. http://centraljerseyhand.com.
Dupuytren's risks: http://www.handctr.com/dupuytrens-disease-faq.html nerve, tendon, infection and other issues can occur stiffness infection, bleeding swelling are all possible recently many have sought alternative ways to treat this here is a podcast that details that as well http://www.Handsurgerypodcast.Com/dupuytrens-disease.Html.
Several risks. Besides the chance of reacting to anesthetic, bleeding or developing an infection, there is the risk of skin loss/slow healing. Nerve damage can cause permanent numbness/pain and scar tissue, stiffness. Also the contracture can reoccur. That is why we don't operate on mild cases. The alternatives include physical therapy, no surgery and an injectable medication to dissolve bands.

Related Questions

What are the risks of surgery for dupuytren's contracture?

Several. Surgery to excise the pathologic tissue from dupuytren's diease carries many of the same risks as other surgery - infection, scarring, stiffness, nerve or artery injury. Because of the way the dupuytren's cords can wrap around the nerve and artery the risk to them is 1-5% (higher if it is a re-do surgery) other main risks are recurrent disease, recurrent contracture, and flare reaction. Read more...
Several. Risks of dupuytren's contracture surgery include: infection, nerve injury, excessive scar tissue formation, chronic pain syndrome. Recurrence rate depends on several factors including family history, stage of disease and age at the time of surgery. Read more...
Several . Risks specific to surgery for dupuytrens would largely relate to wound healing, nerve and vessel injury and recurrence. The degree of risk would relate to the extent of disease and of course experience of the surgeon. Other options such as needle aponeurotomy and xiaflex (collagenase clostridium histolyticum) Collagenase are not without similar risk and each case needs to be evaluated individually. Read more...
Pain and numbness. Surgery for dupuytren's contracture can be technically demanding. After surgery it is not uncommon to experience pain/numbness in the palm and straightened finger(s). It may take 2 weeks for the wound to heal and several weeks of therapy to regain full motion. With any treatment for dupuytren's contracture, recurrence is a possibility. Check with a hand surgeon about non-op treatment with xiaflex (collagenase clostridium histolyticum). Read more...
Dupuytren's. http://www.handctr.com/dupuytrens-disease-faq.html nerve, tendon, infection and other issues can occur. Read more...
Dupuytren's. http://www.handctr.com/dupuytrens-disease-faq.html nerve, tendon, infection and other issues can occur stiffness infection, bleeding swelling are all possible recently many have sought alternative ways to treat this here is a podcast that details that as well http://www.Handsurgerypodcast.Com/dupuytrens-disease.Html. Read more...
Lots when done open. Most common complications include nerve injury, tendon injury, arterial injury, recurrence, stiffness, infection & hematoma. Consider minimally invasive needle aponeurotomy or xiaflex (collagenase clostridium histolyticum) injection. http://centraljerseyhand.com. Read more...

Can you tell me the risks of surgery for dupuytren's contracture?

There are several... Surgery for dupuytren's contracture is very safe. However, the usual risks of surgery apply anytime the skin is cut: pain, infection, bleeding, nerve/vessel injury, and stiffness. In dupuytren's contracture surgery, great care is taken to avoid injury to the nerves and vessels. Some patients will develop a recurrence of the contracture. Therapy will be recommended to improve finger flexibility. Read more...
#1. Sensory nerve injury thus operation best done by peripheral nerve surgeon with magnification. Often heal slowly. Read more...
Various. Would agree with dr. Waller up to a point. While xiaflex (collagenase clostridium histolyticum) is an excellent option, as may be na in certain cases, they all carry risks and certainly of recurrence. One needs to be careful with all of them in terms of wound healing issues, infection, nerve injury and the possibility of recurrence. See more at www.Myhandhealth.Com, click dupuytrens/xiaflex (collagenase clostridium histolyticum). Read more...
Pain&numbness. All treatments for dupuytren's disease, fasciectomy, needle apponeurotomy, and Collagenase injection, are subject to recurrence. After recurrence, the most common risks of surgery include pain, numbness, wound healing complications and stiffness. It is common to need 2-4 weeks or wound healing, followed by therapy. Read more...
Dupuytren's. http://www.handctr.com/dupuytrens-disease-faq.html nerve, tendon, infection and other issues can occur stiffness infection, bleeding swelling are all possible recently many have sought alternative ways to treat this here is a podcast that details that as well http://www.Handsurgerypodcast.Com/dupuytrens-disease.Html. Read more...
Many. Same risks as in most surgery. But the biggest risk is recurrence. Wide surgical excision is the only way to avoid recurrence. Read more...
Dupuytren's. http://www.handctr.com/dupuytrens-disease-faq.html nerve, tendon, infection and other issues can occur with any treatment surgery, aponeurotomy and Collagenase injection. Surgery has a typically more prolonged recovery period but lasts longer. Aponeurotomy and Collagenase have a shorter recovery period but recurrence is quicker more info on facebook at http://tinyurl.Com/b5mn7vg. Read more...
Dupuytren's. http://tinyurl.com/b5mn7vg nerve, tendon, infection and other issues can occur stiffness infection, bleeding swelling are all possible recently many have sought alternative ways to treat this here is a podcast that details that as well http://www.Handsurgerypodcast.Com/dupuytrens-disease.Html. Read more...
Dupuytren's risks: http://www.handctr.com/dupuytrens-disease-faq.html or on facebook http://tinyurl.Com/b5mn7vg nerve, tendon, infection and other issues can occur stiffness infection, bleeding swelling are all possible recently many have sought alternative ways to treat this here is a podcast that details that as well http://www.Handsurgerypodcast.Com/dupuytrens-disease.Html. Read more...
Lots when done open. Most common complications include nerve injury, tendon injury, arterial injury, recurrence, stiffness, infection & hematoma. Consider minimally invasive needle aponeurotomy or xiaflex (collagenase clostridium histolyticum) injection. http://centraljerseyhand.com. Read more...

How effective is surgery for Dupuytren's contracture disease?

Very effective. it is generally very effective. There is also a local injection available for this disorder which may remove theneed for surgery. Read more...
Very effective. surgery is a great option as long as you dont mind the long recovery period. It certainly has the lowest recurrence rate of all the other treatments for dupuytren s . Read more...
Hand Surgeon. There are 3 options for treatment of dupuytren's contracture: 1) fasciectomy - long recovery 2) needle aponeurotomy - see my article in journal of hand surgery april 2012 3) xiaflex the treatment chosen will depend on the experience of your hand surgeon and the location and severity of the cords. http://www.Centraljehrseyhand.Com/dupuytrens-contracture-surgery.Htm. Read more...
Dupuytrens is a. genetic familial disease, that is a progressive thickening of the fascia, a tough fibrous layer of tissue in the palm, Dupuytrens starts as nodules and can progress to cords causing joint contracture in the hand. http://handctr.com/dupuytrens-disease-faq.html and http://handctr.com/xiaflex-for-dupuytrens-information.html and https://youtu.be/aiMsrLECOOw?list=PLaYVr8V1oPuBXtJnqRkOJpzn8Js700CWP. Read more...

Will getting surgery to treat dupuytrens contracture disease really help out or not?

Yes. Indications for surgery are related to degree of contracture based on the potential for long term loss of motion if not addressed. Flexion contracture greater than 20 degrees at the mp joint or any contracture involving the pip joint are indications for surgery. Surgery eliminates contracture allowing range of motion of joints but does not guarantee possible recurrence in other fascial chords. Read more...
Yes, but no cure. I believe that minimally invasive treatments for Dup should be tried first. NA and Xiaflex (collagenase clostridium histolyticum) are fantastic ways to treat the contracture without the long recovery of open fasciectomy. Read more...
Dupuytrens treatment. whether it is surgery or collegians injection or aopneurotomy is designed to lessen a contracture of the finger . This is how it "helps" Many who have so called mild disease and even sone who have significant contracture do not have pain, or huge dysfunction for many tasks. So a lot depends upon whether one feels the contracture is limiting . It is important to understand the risks v benefits. Read more...

Can anyone who has done surgery to treat dupuytrens contracture disease please tell me if it truly helped or not?

Yes, may recur. Due to the genetic nature of this disease, there is a chance of recurrence no matter how it's treated. Surgery was the only way to get the fingers straight, but the incisions are painful and take time to heal. There is now an injection that can be used to dissolve the tissue contracting the fingers. Since i started injecting, i rarely do surgery. Talk with an orthopaedic hand surgeon about options. Read more...
Surgical. Proceedures can be very effective. Discuss this with the hand surgeon. Read more...
Dupuytren surgery. Dupuytens is a progressive disorder that at this point does not have a cure but has very successful treatments. Traditionally treatment observed until contracture was severe and surgery was offered. Some new alternatives include needle aponeurotomy, limited fasciaotomy and xiaflex (collagenase clostridium histolyticum) or collagenase http://www.Handctr.Com/dupuytrens-disease-faq.Html. Read more...
Treatable only. There is no cure for dupuytren's. However it is treatable and i recommend seeing a hand surgeon who is an expert in the treatment. There are 3 options for treatment: 1) fasciectomy 2) needle aponeurotomy 3) xiaflex http://centraljerseyhand.Com. Read more...
Yes. i have performed tons of surgeries on dupuytren s and it has helped tremendously but the long time it takes to recover and the therapy involved is usually not too appealing to patients who like to get back to normal living fast. Read more...

Can I use injections for dupuytren contracture? I already had 3 surgeries in each hand. Concerned about scar tissue.

See a hand surgeon. I would speak with a hand surgeon. If the fingers involved have already had surgery, I am not sure how effective the injections would be. Read more...
Maybe. Dupuytren's contractures always recur. A relatively new treatment called xiaflex (collagenase clostridium histolyticum) is an injection that can soften some cords or nodules. You must see a hand surgeon who is approved to administer the drug. Go to the web site for xiaflex (collagenase clostridium histolyticum) to find a doc near you. Read more...
A discussion. With a hand surgeon that does surgery, needle aponeurotomy and uses xiaflex (collagenase clostridium histolyticum) is the best option so that treatment can be tailored to the conditions that exist. http://handsurgerypodcast.podbean.com/mobile/2012/09/12/dupuytrens-disease-new-treatment-updates-xiaflex (collagenase clostridium histolyticum)-and-aponeurotomy/. Read more...
XIAFLEX (collagenase clostridium histolyticum) Can Help. Xiaflex (collagenase clostridium histolyticum) injections will dissolve dupuytren's and scar tissue. So these injections can be useful after previous surgery. Some doctors may prefer surgery but in recurrent disease xiaflex (collagenase clostridium histolyticum) has a very important role. Read more...

Does dupuytren's contacture always progress to the point where surgery is required?

No. Dupuytren's very often requires no treatment if it is mild. There is also an injection available that is very effective in mild to moderate cases. Read more...
No. Palmar nodules do not always progress to contracture. Once there is any contracture, treatment should be considered. New non-surgical alternatives include xiaflex (collagenase clostridium histolyticum) and needle aponeurotomy. See a hand surgeon for an evaluation. http://centraljerseyhand.com. Read more...
No. Dupuytrens is a hereditary disease where the palmar fascia develops benign scarring. Sometimes this scarring simply creates nontender bumps in the palm and then does not progress. Yet in other patients it may progress to form cords that will cause extension contractures/inability to fully extend the digits - these sometimes require procedures to fix the contractures. Read more...
No Dupuytrens may. only wear as firm nodules in the palm of slight cords that do not cause significant contracture. There is no way to predict if one sees a small early nodule, what will happen as time passes. Many have very midl cases and do not need to do anything except be informed of the diagnosis so they do not seek rx for the nodules with surgery see more here http://tiny.cc/yrr9px. Read more...

Has anyone ever heard of anything natural, or alternative medicine that helps reverse dupuytren's contracture?

If mild, help. Stretching your fingers, heavily padded gloves for grasping tasks, massage and heat, and rubbing lanolin cream into your hands. Supplements: n-acetyl-cysteine/nac has been shown to slow the growth of dupuytren cells. Anecdotally, i've heard that zinc supplements have reversed it, and that the paleo diet can help in this regard too. (i don't have any direct experience of that). Read more...
N-acetyl-Cysteine/NA. Thanks to the other post regarding n-acetyl-cysteine/nac. I found online information here. http://www.dupuytren-online.info/research_projects_dupuytren.html in laboratory experiments nac can slow down growth of dupuytren cells it looks like there is a role for research. Whether that is the natural that you meant not sure. But: cut down alcohol use is probably the simplest "natural" advice. Read more...
Dupuytrens Society. http://www.dupuytren-online.info/research_projects_dupuytren.html. Read more...

When should someone have surgery for dupuytren's disease?

Dupuytren's. http://www.handctr.com/dupuytrens-disease-faq.html nerve, tendon, infection and other issues can occur stiffness infection, bleeding swelling are all possible recently many have sought alternative ways to treat this here is a podcast that details that as well http://www.Handsurgerypodcast.Com/dupuytrens-disease.Html. Read more...
Degree ofContracture. It depends whether the contracture is progressing or interfering with use of the hand. i recommend early minimally invasive treatment with NA or Xiaflex (collagenase clostridium histolyticum) before the contracture gets too significant. http://centraljersethand.com. Read more...