How often do doctors check psa and tumor markers for prostate cancer metastasis?

Usually each visit. Psa has high sensitivity for detecting recurrence after radical prostatectomy, but is less sensitive in detecting recurrence after radiation therapy. For monitoring hormone treatment, psa provides a sensitive tool with which to verify treatment response and detect tumor recurrence;.Serial measurements provide reliable evidence.
Every 6 mos for 10yr. We check every 6 months if all looks good for ten years. If something looks suspicious or concerning i will check every three months for a short interim until the problem declares itself one way or another.
Every 3 months. The ususal timeframe to check for prostate cancer recurrence and monitoring is about every 3 to 4 months. The frequency can change depending on the actual number, however.

Related Questions

Dad has advanced prostate cancer with bone metastasis. After orchirectomy, psa down from 270 to 10. Shall he start zometa or xgeva (denosumab)? Which is better?

See Below. Use of bisphosphanates for your dad can be controversial. Here is an excerpt from a recent review article on www.cancernetwork.com which you can use to discuss with your father's doctor to decide what is best for your dad. http://www.cancernetwork.com/bone-metastases/content/article/10165/105118. Read more...
Either . Xgeva (denosumab) does have some advantages over zometa: quicker administration and no kidney side effects. It is associated with fewer bone complications from cancer than zometa. On the other hand, zometa is now generic, meaning that is a lot cheaper. Neither is a curative treatment for prostate cancer and they are both considered adjunct treatments. Thes small differences may or may not justify its use. Read more...
Off label. Neither zoledronate nor Denosumab is approved for disease that has not progressed on initial hormonal therapy. I would recommend waiting until disease progression and thus avoid potential side effects from these treatments. Read more...

What are psa and tumor markers for prostate bone metastasis?

PSA means. Prostate specific antigen. Men all have a level of psa if they have a prostate. Arbitrary normal levels are age & race dependent. If you have prostate cancer, and bones are involved, your psa will likely be greater than 10 ng/ml. Psa levels that double in short intervals are more likely to do this. However, very undifferentiated prostate cancers may not generate psa, and one can have bony mets. Read more...

Can a primary care doctor diagnose you with prostate cancer based on a psa test that shows elevated psa?

Prostate cancer. You can never diagnosed prostate cancer based on a psa test they just aren't that accurate. Diagnosing prostate cancer requires doing a biopsy. Most primary care physicians are good at finding suspicious lesions but they usually refer to urologist for biopsy. Psa tests are not that accurate. Read more...
No, you need biopsy. Psa is prostate specific, not cancer specific. Even in men with elevated psa and prostate nodules about 1/4 of them don't have cancer. Read more...
No. An elevated psa test can be from a variety of conditions. Even markedly elevated psa values do not confirm a cancer diagnosis. Also, a normal psa does not exclude prostate cancer as a possibility. The next best step is to see a urologist for further evaluation for a biopsy of the prostate. Read more...
No. An elevated psa should be the first step that should send a patient on the road for a full evaluation by a urologist. This will include a digital rectal examination and perhaps a biopsy of the prostate. Your primary doctor will help with selection of a urologist if your psa is elevated or has changed over time. Read more...
Maybe. If the psa is 100 the doc can be sure you have it, low values like 6 or 8 are far more common and can just be caused by larger gland sizes. A biopsy is the only way to be sure. Read more...
No but. If the primary care doctor felt a hard nodule on digital rectal exam and the psa is elevated, he or she would be strongly suspicious of prostate cancer and would refer you to a urologist for biopsy. A definite diagnosis can only be made by biopsy. The reason is a benign but enlarged prostate can raise the psa. A hard nodule sometimes is a prostatic stone. Best wishes. Read more...

What are the most advanced tests for diagnosis of metastasis of a primary prostate cancer?

Imaging and PSA. Most patients with metastatic prostate cancer have psa levels above 10 ng/ml. Depending on the location of the metastases, which are usually in the bone, bone scan can detect mets. Read more...
Many choices. A few options here. For bone involvement a na-f18 pet scan is the most sensitive along with MRI scans. Standard bone scan, imho, is outdated. Also, we find the measurement of ctc's (circulating tumor cells, very useful. Standard ct scan is good for lung and liver disease. Last, MRI with iron nanoparticles is great for lymph node + disease evaluation. Prostatscint is not so useful anymore. Read more...