6 doctors weighed in:
What are the chances of an oral HPV infection leading to an oral cancer?
6 doctors weighed in

Dr. Richard Ruden
Dentistry
3 doctors agree
In brief: High risk
The number of head and neck cancers linked to the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (hpv) has increased sharply over the past two decades, and the virus now accounts for more cancers than tobacco or alcohol, a new study finds.
The study found that the rate of hpv-related oral cancer rose from 0.8 cases per 100, 000 people in the 1980s to 2.6 cases per 100, 000 people in the 2000s —.

In brief: High risk
The number of head and neck cancers linked to the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (hpv) has increased sharply over the past two decades, and the virus now accounts for more cancers than tobacco or alcohol, a new study finds.
The study found that the rate of hpv-related oral cancer rose from 0.8 cases per 100, 000 people in the 1980s to 2.6 cases per 100, 000 people in the 2000s —.
Dr. Richard Ruden
Dr. Richard Ruden
Thank
In brief: High
Hpv infections predisposes oral cancer.

In brief: High
Hpv infections predisposes oral cancer.
Dr. Addagada Rao
Dr. Addagada Rao
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Dell Goodrick
Testing positive for HPV does not necessarily mean you will definitely develop cancer. The earlier the RISK for oral cancer is detected or the earlier oral cancer itself is detected, the more likely it can be treated successfully. Most oral HPV infections do not cause cancer, but the increased risk IS THERE. It does depend on the type of HPV and should be cause for concern and monitored closely. Any changes in color or texture of the mouth, tongue, throat or sores that do not heal should be discussed with your doctor or dental professional.
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Peter Kurzweil
Board Certified, Internal Medicine
46 years in practice
16M people helped
Continue
107,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors